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I haven't heeled out since my last post ages ago. Long story. But I had a couple outings recently shopping for Christmas gifts.  The first was to an outdoor mall wearing a pair of black faux leather taper heeled booties.  And the second was in a pair of black sueded block heeled booties.  

Neither outing was bad on its own to be honest. Just a bit out of my comfort zone. Unlike my first trip into an empty store I was surrounded by loads of shoppers. And those of you saying nobody notices are either delusional or encouraging others under false pretenses. People do notice. I lost track of the number of smirks, averted gazes, and rubber necking. Most people are too polite to actually say anything but they do notice. The simple fact is you have to decide for yourself that you don't care what they think. And to be honest I'm not there yet. I thought I was but no. 

I don't say any of this to discourage anyone who is on the fence.  Actually quite the contrary is true. I encourage everyone to at least try.  I will definitely try again but under different circumstances that fit more with my comfort zone. 

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I have always said people notice, fortunately I'm old enough to not care. Many places I frequent often, people have come to expect me in heels and I usually don't disappoint. 

I do wear high stilettos but never otherwise dress in feminine attire, my beard doesn't lend itself to dresses etc. Still stilettos and slacks or blue jeans is a good look in my opinion, at least I've always felt so, men or women. 

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I agree Peeptoe, people do notice.  I've often wondered about those here that state otherwise.  True, they don't comment or otherwise make a spectacle about it, but they do notice.

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Well, I wear low-heeled knee and over the knee boots over skinny jeans all the time and nobody notices at all, no more than when I wear hiking boots or trainers or anything else. I am neither delusional nor being ingenuous, nor am I out there with heightened sensitivities imagining stares, smirks or approbation. But then there is nothing about what I am wearing that is remarkable or worthy of a stare - jeans, boots, jumper, all perfectly masculine. It really is no big deal. 

Edited by Shyheels
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Peeptoe i was in your exact shoes and had the same thoughts, so i understand fully well.

Although many here will say the opposite for good reason. There are many factors going into wearing booties you wore and shown in your post. 

First off when i was in your situation i was hyper observing everyone at a slightest glance, smirk, laugh set me off to believe oh no are they judging me, yet it had nothing to do with it.  Saying all that i wasn't stupid or totally paranoid either. Indeed many  looking giggling, teenagers, asian families, older woman with upset demeanour, single black woman with young kids shaking their heads discussing me that i look like a woman, tisk tisk. Angry young woman with there boyfriend voicing next to  my ear that i should be ashamed and embarrassed not proud wearing tight female denim leggings and those heel booties, disgusting. Sales people not helping me in stores virtually running away discussing about me with others that i'm on my way to becoming a dangerous psychopath because i don't care what people think of my attire in public. 

To help with your heeling pick an environment that is conducive to wearing heels. I know areas that if i walk in heel booties i be only one of either gender. Even if a woman wore heels she be looked upon oddly.  Sometimes just what your wearing or demeanour people will stare  upon you for no apparent reason and make judgements even smirk laugh at your attire unless it's so plain or ordinary. If you choose a good location and like some here post in there jaunts repeatedly visit people tend to get use to it and the smirks, laughs. stares gradually go away. in fact people tend to accept your heel style and compliment your bold courage to wear what you choose anti-establishment characters come to mind.

Set aside a good location to heel in public. Often find downtown areas are so busy people have no time to pause stare make commentary about your heels. Pick a good outfit that works with your heels makes peoples mind change saying yah he looks not to bad if you can get over the heels he's wearing..

Finally be busy meaning don't look for others accepting your style standing alone in the middle of  square begging to be seen hands out yelling look at me. If you find your mind is preoccupied, instead the place your in. then others are just background noise racing by never seen again and forgotten. Look at how many attractive woman don't give rats %ss when shopping onto others. Busy on there phones texting what there doing later meeting someone planning evening out focused on what they need to buy making a list, nail polish, tampons, XL condoms, licorice thong, padded bra, etc... you get the point keep your mind busy. Have a cup of Starbucks in one hand phone in the other while holding onto the shopping bags walking with purpose. If you feel sad ready to shed a tear put on some designer sunglasses on inside making you look so self absorbed worried only about yourself none else.

Think about it this way, people have hang ups we all do and certain lines we all won't cross. So to understand others will never accept your style ever so don't try to please them or wait for therm to accept you they will never do. Your not making friends walking out the door to shop doesn't matter what your wearing. So when you arrive home at least you feel better that you wore what you wanted and nobody could stop you from doing so. Then you feel better about yourself wearing clothes on your terms not what society deems acceptable or fashionable for your gender. 

Haters and prejudice people will always exist nothing you could do about it. Only when wearing heels or outfits that are unique i know from peoples reactions they aren't ready to see someone like me. Gives me insight on people's character living  a sheltered life never seeing a man in feminine fashions thus reacting as they do confused. After wearing your style out in public often enough it becomes easier and people tend to lighten up around. Intrigued  people will be chatting  you up then anyone else just for intrigue or curiousity. 

Think of it this way, taking the  easy road, nothing interesting comes of it. Having some adversity in life if you can pull through the hardships, in the beginning, makes your character stronger more intriguing attracting others to you which they normally wouldn't.  I'm testament to that yes lot of people shunned me in the beginning not being polite ignoring me because of my attire. Had many thoughts to quit stop the insanity mocked laughed ridiculed yet i kept my composure and fears not showing minded my business. Deep down knew i was doing the right thing for me maybe grown a complex of some sort very negative towards woman in particular. Yet today i can't tell you how many woman are attracted to me yet so shy to make a move or subtly checking me out. Only few brave enough to compliment me loving my style. 

Your choice, waste your time hiding from these haters because believing there judging you.  While it takes time to adjust when someone slaps you on one cheek turn the other cheek. Forgive them and it will make you a better person others will recognize that not the heels your wearing. Often others will see how your being treated by haters and will have compassion to give a smiling friendly compliment. 

 

 

Edited by MackyHeels
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I openly wear high heels too.

In my humble opinion I think almost everyone notices. I mean we all look when we hear high heels approaching. (perhaps thats just me) I know that eyes will go to me when I wear heels, but it goes with the territory.

In my experience women appreciate shoes more and they often like what I am wearing and will compliment me on my shoes/legs - more often than men do. Overall though I get a lot of compliments every day from men and women and it is empowering.

I like being noticed, I understand the whole 'wear high heels to boost your confidence thing' ... its a true thing .. put on a good pair of stilettos and I feel quite bold.

Yes I am often watched by most people, and I watch their heads follow me as I walk in to a shop or a restaurant/cafe etc... but thats power to me. I don't get a hard time - I think people kind of 'get it'. I don't want to be a woman, but I am wearing a dress/skirt and heels.

I get almost as many people noticing I am wearing heels when I wear jeans (admittedly not that often) and pumps. Now normally when I wear jeans I don't go beyond 4 inches, sometimes only 2 inch heels. I still get a lot of people noticing I am wearing 'high heels'... and it kind of feels more awkward to me in these situations than if I had bare legs and pumps - because the later is out there - I feel like people might think I am trying to hide my shoes with jeans? Perhaps not but my point is, I know my style is usually bold, but when I go conservative I still get a lot of people noticing my heels.

I think high heels are made to draw attention, and we are pre-wired as a population to look towards the sound/silhouette of high heels.

enough of my rambking.

 

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In the summer when I have 4-6 inch shorts on there is no question I also have heels. In the winter time, like today, I don't think many notice the 4 inch heels I had on. But I did have two woman notice my nails today with one saying she's going to copy my color with the sparkles - just her style.

Bottom line, if you are out there in the public there is always the chance you will be noticed.  ENJOY IT.

Edited by Cali
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5 hours ago, Peeptoe said:

 

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I love your taste in shoes!  I am a sucker for buckles.  

When I started wearing dress cowboy boots into the office a few years ago, people immediately started identifying me by my boots.  I had thought this would be more common in Texas, but I immediately became known as the “guy who wears boots” to people who didn’t know me well.  I am sure most people did not notice at first, but those who noticed talked to people who don’t notice and soon everyone notices.  It’s not an insult - it’s just a way to identity a person to someone else when the name or other identifiers don’t make a connection.  But that is just a beginning, and over time people we build on what they know, and we develop deeper  understanding of each other and the shoes are just a small part of the whole picture.  

In that sense, I know what I am getting into by wearing heels.  Yes, enough people will probably notice and it would not surprise me if I became known as the “guy who wears heels.”  But I don’t expect it to be a barrier to developing relationships with people.  If anything, it may help us all get to know each other better.  

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2 hours ago, Cali said:

But I did have two woman notice my nails today with one saying she's going to copy my color with the sparkles - just her style.

thats just it.

women notice the little things!

they'll see your nails, they'll see that your shoes match your bag, or that your heels are damaged (heaven forbid), or that your legs are newly spray tanned etc...

they aren't afraid to give a compliment.

I think we need to be who we are and have faith in the human race - that our species isn't' as bad as the few bad eggs out there. Most of us are open minded people.

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Peeptoe,

I don't believe anyone actually believes nobody notices. When they say that it is said more out of a recognition nothing negative happened which caused the heel wearer to notice. None of us can control the five senses of others but we can control how we process our interaction with others. Look at other drivers. People speed, change lanes and turn without signaling, throw cigarette butts and other things out the window, treat their phone with more dignity than safely navigating public roadways. Some of these people are verified slobs who should rot in hell or be shipped to Mars in 2024. Some are probably narcissistic angry people. I cannot let any of this get to me as I traverse the same roads. I notice what they do but I do not react. I visited one of our members here, Steve63130, and went to a big mall in Columbus, Ohio wearing 5.5" tan wedges and carrying a handbag and had a great time. Did anyone notice?? I know the salesladies at Bakers noticed my wedges and even complimented the fringe handbag I had. Anybody else notice? Probably but it never registered so it didn't matter. The trick is to develop confidence in yourself. Firstly, you are doing nothing wrong not even by conservative Indiana standards. Secondly, most people just don;t have the guts to actually say something crappy to you one on one. Thirdly, you have as much right to enjoy yourself wearing what you want as anyone else. Fourthly, your money is just as green as that in the wallets and purses of those who may or may not stare at you. Once that confidence comes out and you walk straight ahead paying no heed to those who rubberneck or stare and stop they all will realise you do not care and cannot be be deterred or discouraged. Personally, I prefer calm and peace but I also know I do not exist to take other people's shit. Life is fleeting and rather short and should be enjoyed as free from irrelevant background noise as possible. Your desire to wear heels will not fade so you should embrace the eventuality you will wear your heels in public sooner or later. HappyinHeels  

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I think the vast majority of people blithely go about in their own bubbles, seeing, perhaps, but not observing, not registering what they see in any meaningful sense. Unless you're striding purposefully into a convenience store at 10pm wearing a balaclava few people are going to notice in any memorable way what you're wearing. And even then they'll just recall the balaclava, nothing else. You'd find the eyewitness statements almost comically diverse - the perp wearing everything from a sarong to a crushed velvet tux. The only thing they'd get right would be the balaclava, but whether it was dark blue or black or possibly maroon would be anybody's guess.

Edited by Shyheels
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Interesting threat here. 

First of all, @Peeptoe - I like your booties!

Secondly, having never really heeled outside, I am SURE people would notice... but it obviously depends on the environment, as others have said. In some environments, people have the time to notice and stare, and in others (down town etc), they won't.  And again, its a matter of us noticing others notice us... if that makes sense!   And if you don't care much, then you don't notice them noticing you...! 

So if you want to continue heeling, you will need to build that confidence. Start in less public places/times and slowly build it up. If you feel its beyond your comfort zone, then just don't do it - the main point is to enjoy your heels and if you getting anxious about it, take a (proverbial) step back! 

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Of course people do notice but don't care in several circumstances, e.g. downtown in a busy street, at the movies, etc.

Specifically in places where they don't expect to encounter relatives I would say.

 

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There are a couple of things in play here. Firstly, it depends very much how one is dressed. If you're wearing a frock and man-spreading on a crowded commuter train in a pair of stiletto thigh boots, yeah, sure people will notice. If you're dressed as per some of the images on the coffee thread - regular jeans and heeled ankle boots, especially with the jeans over part of the boots (not to hide them but because that is a fairly typical way to dress with jeans and ankle boots) then I doubt anyone will notice.

The other thing in play here is a complex blend of self-consciousness and wishful thinking, a desire to be noticed as being seen is itself a form of acknowledgement.  

Edited by Shyheels
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18 hours ago, Peeptoe said:

I haven't heeled out since my last post ages ago. Long story. But I had a couple outings recently shopping for Christmas gifts.  The first was to an outdoor mall wearing a pair of black faux leather taper heeled booties.  And the second was in a pair of black sueded block heeled booties.  

Neither outing was bad on its own to be honest. Just a bit out of my comfort zone. Unlike my first trip into an empty store I was surrounded by loads of shoppers. And those of you saying nobody notices are either delusional or encouraging others under false pretenses. People do notice. I lost track of the number of smirks, averted gazes, and rubber necking. Most people are too polite to actually say anything but they do notice. The simple fact is you have to decide for yourself that you don't care what they think. And to be honest I'm not there yet. I thought I was but no. 

I don't say any of this to discourage anyone who is on the fence.  Actually quite the contrary is true. I encourage everyone to at least try.  I will definitely try again but under different circumstances that fit more with my comfort zone. 

manhattancollection-undine-black01.jpg

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I believe you are correct, people do notice.  I guess it all depends on the style you are wearing, along with the rest of your outfit.  Admittedly, my levis usually partially cover my 4" stiletto boot heels, making my boots a little less obvious.   Heel noise will attract attention also, personally I like my boots with softer soles and heels, not interested in making a lot of heel noise.  I have progressed to the point of my levis resting on top of my 3" Frye cowgirl boot heels, so I am sure plenty of people notice.  And, it is like you say, most folks are polite enough not to twist their heads around/stare/comment.  I look forward to the day when my confidence has reached a level where I can where my boots over a pair of skinny jeans and not be nervous about it....

The thing to remember is that people don't notice nearly as often as we fear they do....This is a self imposed obstacle to having fun in heels...

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The truth is, some people notice, some people don't. If you are insecure and out of your comfort zone, is it possible that you aren't walking gracefully in heels? That kind of body language in itself would get attention. We've all see awkward young teens wearing heels and perhaps smiled or chuckled. But do you say anything? Of course not. If you get out there and practice a lot, it will get easier and easier, but it does take practice. Once you have the hang of it and walk gracefully, people are much less likely to notice, and after a while, you'll be so used to wearing heels, you won't bother looking at people to see if they notice or not. You just won't care. Have fun! It's a great journey!

Steve

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That's totally right. Is true in 99% situations 

execpt: a bunch of jung drunk guys,searching for someone they could give pain to. So there are some  city  areas  I would never  walk in heels. 

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14 hours ago, Shyheels said:

The other thing in play here is … a desire to be noticed as being seen is itself a form of acknowledgement.  

So true!!! 

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How many people notice? I guess that depends upon whom you ask. My wife is convinced that everybody notices, and that they all stop what they're doing for a second or two and stare in malignant disbelief. I, on the other hand, think only a few people notice, and few react. The truth is probably somewhere in between. This is a useless statistic, but I'm going to put it out there anyway--I think about 10% of casual observers notice from any sort of distance, but of those, 90% do not have any sort of visible reaction.

In addition, I think it's becoming less and less of a big deal to wear heels out in public. I have noticed less and less reaction as the years go by, and when I do get a reaction that is big enough for me to even discern, it's been positive.

However, I don't pretend that people don't talk about me later on, after my encounters with them. My son, who works part-time at Wal-Mart while he's going to school, told me about a month ago that one of his coworkers came into the stock room and told him, "There is a man in the store who is wearing high heels!" My son evidently asked the coworker, "This man.  .  . was he with a little Asian kid?" "Well.  .  . yeah, as a matter of fact. How did you know?" "That's my dad." My son didn't really say how negative the comment was, but the way he told it, it was more surprise than anything.

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And the sky did not fall and the corn kept on growing. I think after the words "That's my dad" could have been added "and your point is...?" but your son inferred he was completely at ease and the rest of the world should be as well. :fine: HinH

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I believe people will notice the question is does it matter if they do. My last outing in heels was at a very busy motorway services, hundreds of people walking about around me. I can’t see that my heels were not seen by someone during the time I was there. The point is  I wasn’t looking around for this and if someone at a nearby table laughed during their conversation I didn’t assume it was about my fashion choices.

I’ve been lucky because being in heels with my Wife’s support has boosted my confidence. I’m not saying I’m 100% comfortable in any situation but I am realising that it’s not a big a deal to people that I expected it to be.

 

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Yes, people will notice men who wear high heels in public, to which I say....SO WHAT?

That fact has always been a given. When I began my outing thread ten years ago, I was noticed when I wore heels under long jeans, today I parade around in skirts and dresses (most of them short), handbags, earrings, even the once in a blue moon dalliance with lipstick, people notice that too, they’d be blind as bats if they didn’t notice a six foot two inch, middle aged black man decked out from head to toe in women’s wear, and you know what....I DON’T CARE! Perhaps I approach this from the angle of having a decade’s worth of experience freestyling under my belt, but, in my biased opinion, it’s just no big deal that people notice. I’ve said on more than a few occasions that people are usually too wrapped up in their own lives and affairs to care about a guy in a skirt and heels, they’ll see me for a few fleeting moments in passing, then I’m quickly forgotten and never thought about again. It simply isn’t that big a deal. Not at all.

Something else I’ve said plenty of times, and it’s incredibly important is that you make the best possible appearance when out in public. When you dress well and carry yourself with class and dignity, people will accept you for your presentation, or, more than likely, not give a damn one way or the other. Sure, I’ve gotten looks, long stares, second glances, the whole nine yards, I’ve long since accepted that and it no longer bothers me, not even when cruising down bustling downtown streets or crowded shopping malls. In all the years I’ve done this, I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve gotten negative comments and still have fingers left, exactly the opposite, I’ve had women AND men compliment me on my appearance, giving me kind words on everything from my clothes, shoes, jewelry, even my handbags. The fact I’ve been treated well by complete strangers tells me that I’m doing this right, and that means a lot.

i understand that not everyone here is as accomplished as I am when it comes to doing outings, and others don’t have the confidence, or the boldness to do what folks like me or nzfreestyler do when it comes to our public presentation, so, you just do the very best you can, and, above all, take pride in how you present yourself so that it doesn’t matter that you’re noticed.

 

Edited by JeffB
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JeffB you said best. What i conclude reading many posts in this forum and from experience whenever a male is fully open, honest, wearing entire feminine outfit. He is better accepted compared to one choosing outfit that is half masculine and feminine. Conclude people get confused or find it odd to look upon someone that doesn't complete an outfit for his or her gender coming off as androgynous style.  Just like many here showing there outfits who boldly wear fully garbed in feminine outfits such as skirts, tunics, dresses, pantyhose, stiletto heels, wedges, hand bag, makeup, manicures, pedicures, etc.. get less negative reactions such as long stares or cackle laughter afterwards.

Sometimes in my outings many overlook my appearance and i sneak through without being noticed, lucky me. While other people closely stare, observing my upper body wearing male fashions,  while belt down in feminine styles. This confuses people and reactions tend to be puzzlement and later bemusement figuring indeed i look half man half woman. While others who delve in a more serious female style i wrote earlier have no problems with people being confused. People ignore what they clearly see, not liking it, or accept them  for who they are, CD, or assume LGBTQIA group thus no need for any overreaction.

Seen this play out in the gym wearing strictly obvious female athletic attire colours, brand name logos visible. Many must conclude without blinking an eye or taking a closer look he dresses exactly like a woman, accepting it with no drama delivered. Either they see me initially for the first time are shocked but conclude what i wrote earlier he  likes wearing  women's clothes. In fact seen colleague male mock certain females directly in front of me, seen  wearing exact outfits colour choices etc...  Greeting them with hugs and kisses using my name in vain so to speak, as though they got confused who's who..  

As time passes people who seen me for years wearing strictly feminine athletic tight fitting clothes showing my shape mellow out. In fact initially name calling assumptions being gossiped about. Yet when people notice you for years begin to accept my style even encourage it with compliments the truth finally comes out they were jealous envious with looking upon me. Now they find themselves in competition with the clothes i buy or wear finding common ground just like my female counterparts i enjoy to shop wear new fresh different colourful outfits boldly, without care what others would think or say. While small group of encouraging woman exist for me do feel there are many more who at least want some validation from me upon there new outfits. Guessing they respect my taste in female attire yet none better to read my reactions what they are wearing.

Walking from work late Friday night with male co-worker while in passing seen a male crossdresser in blonde long wig and makeup. My co-worker overreacted saying woe, laughing what the world is going to hell, yet corrected himself saying i do some F&*Kup things myself.  Yet i responded she looked like homely female co-worker sister. My co-worker i was walking with corrected me said no brother didn't you notice it was a guy? Sort of knew it but didn't want to judge him with the same wide brush. Yet the crossdresser had his head held high yet something told me it had to feel difficult to walk out in public like that. While my co-worker kept mocking the CD saying wow he even held his head high as though it was wrong for him to do so.

Even at my workplace a victoria secret runway model showed up posing for pictures with attractive friend. Seen the female friend before she reacted poorly to my tight jeans style snearing. Now that i know i'm regarded poorly upon my style to this specific fashionista i didn't bother to look upon them even ignoring there photo IG posing sessions legs up on chairs etc.. many others had their eyes glued to them even wanting to say hello. If they don't respect my style i double the effect, hating them more, then usual person i don't know. Some people i chatted with didn't like  them as well being so self absorbed only caring what others are wearing judging them while dolled up in there designer nude coloured sheer tight fitting clothes. Later that night i seen them leaving together the models while one young girl wanted to say hello before they were escaping. Had my phone speaker on playing some nasty strip club songs from Juicy J - Can't stop Dem Whoes was so appropriate watching them leave in there high stilletos and skinny legs and flat butt.

 

Edited by MackyHeels

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Macky, 

I wear between 50% and 100% female clothes everyday, always in heels and toe and finger nails to die for. In the last week I've had several woman tell me they want fingernails like mine for Christmas, taking close up pictures to show their manicurist. But extremely few are confused as to my gender. I dress masculine in most women's clothes.

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13 hours ago, mlroseplant said:

How many people notice? I guess that depends upon whom you ask. My wife is convinced that everybody notices, and that they all stop what they're doing for a second or two and stare in malignant disbelief. I, on the other hand, think only a few people notice, and few react. The truth is probably somewhere in between. This is a useless statistic, but I'm going to put it out there anyway--I think about 10% of casual observers notice from any sort of distance, but of those, 90% do not have any sort of visible reaction.

In addition, I think it's becoming less and less of a big deal to wear heels out in public. I have noticed less and less reaction as the years go by, and when I do get a reaction that is big enough for me to even discern, it's been positive.

However, I don't pretend that people don't talk about me later on, after my encounters with them. My son, who works part-time at Wal-Mart while he's going to school, told me about a month ago that one of his coworkers came into the stock room and told him, "There is a man in the store who is wearing high heels!" My son evidently asked the coworker, "This man.  .  . was he with a little Asian kid?" "Well.  .  . yeah, as a matter of fact. How did you know?" "That's my dad." My son didn't really say how negative the comment was, but the way he told it, it was more surprise than anything.

Right, surprise is not a bad thing.  A little harmless surprise adds color to our day.  If we just see people wearing the same things every day then life might get boring and there would be nothing to talk about.  

 

3 hours ago, MackyHeels said:

JeffB you said best. What i conclude reading many posts in this forum and from experience whenever a male is fully open, honest, wearing entire feminine outfit. He is better accepted compared to one choosing outfit that is half masculine and feminine. Conclude people get confused or find it odd to look upon someone that doesn't complete an outfit for his or her gender coming off as androgynous style.  

But women mix and match feminine and masculine fashion all the time, and there doesn’t seem to be any confusion.  Women have been slowly moving away from dresses, skirts, and heels, and are wearing suits, pants, and oxfords, and there are many that look good doing so while looking feminine.  Women seem to be good at expanding the boundaries of feminine fashion.  Is this something that men could pull off?  Could we wear kilts and higher heels and push the scope of men’s fashion past the current scope to gain acceptance of these elements as part of a masculine outfit and look?  Personally, this experimentation with new boundaries of a masculine outfit is what I am more interested in, rather than how to dress feminine.  

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Dressing feminine is relatively easy compared to incorporating women fashion into your every day clothes and projecting masculine. Adding color is one of the first steps. Years ago I lost 65 pounds and (happily) had to replace many segments of my wardrobe. I switched several sections of my wardrobe to women's versions because they either fit better (I like tighter fitting tops) or there isn't a male version. And I have more colorful clothes as a result. I call what I do as blending, not freestyling.  Many times a women's tall medium fits better than the men's version, tighter, showing off my lack of a (round) belly

1 hour ago, p1ng74 said:

But women mix and match feminine and masculine fashion all the time, and there doesn’t seem to be any confusion.

What started me was jealousy and envy. I was jealous that women are allowed to mix and match feminine and masculine fashion but men weren't. Jealous that women had items that men didn't, such as leggings, and the right to color. I'm still jealous and envious that I can't wear leggings to work. But I can and do wear high heels.  Still men can't wear polka dot tops or horizontal striped tops. I get looks when I wear a lilac top unless I pair it perfectly.

After many decades of severe ankle problems and multiple surgeries and rehabs, I discovered that I had women's shape feet and have only purchase women's shoes.  I haven't had ankle problem since.

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Some here may have misunderstood what point  i'm trying to get across. Woman often or never purchase on the men's side of the store  isle like pants for example. Females have there own attire that look similar to male styles but they make it there own. While some stores like H&M make feminine styles for men. My recent outing at work i was wearing a long tunic male style, over my skinny cropped jeggings. My male coworker complimented me while i mocked my style to him saying to him shirt, its a dress, lol... Yet even if i picked out a female version of the same long hemed curved style tunic shirt open collar showing off much of my bare shoulders, upper back, and smooth chest who would notice the difference. Only thing they would see maybe a brand logo or different lilac colour rather bland grey which i was wearing. 

Amusing to observe some designer male shirts i wear sometimes show off my upper body because of the wide collar. Seeing i'm looked upon oddly styled feminine but the actual shirt was strictly made for male side of the isle it was meant to be purchased and worn for a man. Yet people don't know think i'm wearing a female blouse yet it's designer JV just a cut that men normally don't wear or find it to feminine. 

Bought myself woman black dress pants while ago feeling they are different then men's style which i like alot. Wore them to work seemingly they appear basic loose style black pants. On closer examination those who know can see the leg inseam is shorter, the fit is much more tight along the hips, the stretch is forgiven not rigid like male pants, pockets are smaller which emphasises shape of my buttocks yet loose the style is different compared to male pants. Woman often wearing male style pants have accented it with complimenting their shape prominently the hips. 

Even female blazer jackets are cut and styled differently then men's like the woman's style lot better. If you're anything like me enjoying to show off male physique through clothing is what i enjoy doing. Male styles often are to bulky or cut wrong so your shape is hidden in rectangular box. Just simple T-shirt male styles i've looked and seen are cut sharply while female styles are hemed curved to exploit there curves which looks much better on both genders, yet one is woman's the other is men's. 

What point i'm having difficulty expressing is NZfreestyler isn't who someone would be confused, what he is all about. None will tell our beloved high heel member your wearing heels OMG! do you realize what your doing. Only because his entire outfit skirt dress, jacket, purse, blouse is styled appropiately feminine.  So none will comment or judge only appreciate his unique style that he loves to wear. Either you ignore him leaving him be or compliment his precious style as adorable. Rather spewing negative rude comments that anyone with sense will believe your not going to change his mind or care he would listen.

So to with my female outfits in the gym everyone notices but few say negative comment aware i either have fetish for leggings or just enjoy being exhibitionist. Gives me a license to wear whatever colour i wish no matter what it is. While the truth is anyone looking upon me will conclude he exposes his body shape as well as he can. Some appreciate it others intrigued  comparing themselves to my body parts making a clear judgement. Most can't point fingers and accept for how i appear. 

 

Edited by MackyHeels

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4 hours ago, Cali said:

Dressing feminine is relatively easy compared to incorporating women fashion into your every day clothes and projecting masculine. Adding color is one of the first steps. Years ago I lost 65 pounds and (happily) had to replace many segments of my wardrobe. I switched several sections of my wardrobe to women's versions because they either fit better (I like tighter fitting tops) or there isn't a male version. And I have more colorful clothes as a result. I call what I do as blending, not freestyling.  Many times a women's tall medium fits better than the men's version, tighter, showing off my lack of a (round) belly

What started me was jealousy and envy. I was jealous that women are allowed to mix and match feminine and masculine fashion but men weren't. Jealous that women had items that men didn't, such as leggings, and the right to color. I'm still jealous and envious that I can't wear leggings to work. But I can and do wear high heels.  Still men can't wear polka dot tops or horizontal striped tops. I get looks when I wear a lilac top unless I pair it perfectly.

After many decades of severe ankle problems and multiple surgeries and rehabs, I discovered that I had women's shape feet and have only purchase women's shoes.  I haven't had ankle problem since.

Yes I can see the feminine association with polka dot but restrictions against horizontal stripes and certain color shirts is silly.  I guess I have been colorful for so long that I no longer think much about being the only guy in the office in lilac or a hot pink shirt.  Wearing the same white or blue as everyone else is too boring.  

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I never heard of anything against horizontal stripes - loads of men's jumpers and rugby shirts have horizontal strips.  Large polka dots aren't usually found on men's shirts, but   small-dot patterns on sorts and ties are not uncommon. And the colour palette for men's business shirts has expanded considerably in recent years and it is not too difficult  to find one in lilac or pink, nor would anyone attract stares by wearing such a shirt. 

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I have both a pale pink dress shirt and a medium pink polo shirt and have gotten nothing but the best comments when I wore them. HinH

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