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2 hours ago, bambam said:

I was out and about last night in a blazer, skinny jeans, and my Jessica Simpson stiletto platforms, and after bracing myself to get out of the car again and walk into the building, as I usually have to, I had a thought... ‘What the almighty hell am I doing???’. Any body ever get that? I have people who are very supportive, but still trying to understand why I do this to myself. Gotta be honest, I don’t know, but it keeps me going..

We all feel this way at some point or another....Did you feel better after the outing?  I'm sure you liked the way you looked, even though it involved some initiative and courage....Any compliments?

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14 hours ago, bambam said:

I was out and about last night in a blazer, skinny jeans, and my Jessica Simpson stiletto platforms, and after bracing myself to get out of the car again and walk into the building, as I usually have to, I had a thought... ‘What the almighty hell am I doing???’. Any body ever get that? I have people who are very supportive, but still trying to understand why I do this to myself. Gotta be honest, I don’t know, but it keeps me going..

Yes! i do feel the same, but not always. After further analysis with myself i find only  those thoughts creep in when none is observing me, or there are few people around. If i see someone but they don't notice me or care  and are styled in a very casual manner makes me feel out of sorts. Thinking why bother wearing heels for what reason others won't appreciate it or care. Whom am i showing off to? Am i overdressed compared to everyone else? Often it is the location i'm in which isn't heel friendly or very lame. 

It's not confidence i lack but the experience is less enjoyable when people i observe are styled in lame outfits making me stand out oddly. It's common to observe one woman all dolled up but nobody cares what she is wearing. Yet she gets angry spending lot of money for her outfit but everyone doesn't know what her fashion style is  from Valentino heels to Payless brand.  That is why often woman dress up for dinners showing off standing having drinks for many to observe. After getting tired they can sit down at a table have dinner cross legged dangling there heels enjoying themselves giving compliments and receiving, comparing other like minded heel wearing woman. 

Believe me woman wearing heels have the same thought run through there mind. Often first thing i overhear when  woman talk often complaining about there heels and how stupid they feel wearing them or how they hurt. Yet they fully know what heels do to make an outfit pop, either in skinny jeans, leggings, skirt, dress.. Know matter what damage the heels make to their pretty tiny feet woman love how they style it.  

When your in a environment conducive to heels,  more women are wearing them, it begins a competitive spirit amongst the group if they know it or not. 

There is saying females in Caribbean islands have about fashion. If nobody notices you wearing bright coloured outfit, then your doing something wrong. Often they dress in outrageous flamboyant prints in various colours to gather some second looks.

So to when i had to work bringing me to new location with the crew recently, wearing my designer skinny jeans. Noticed many woman, married moms with kids took double takes observing me and focusing upon my jeans. At first i thought they envied the denim colour wash or recognized the designer brand logo. Yet more women began to stare, it dawned on me they found it unusual to see a male in such tight snug fitting jeans, in my opinion outfitted so well. Nobody laughed in fact some looked a bit surprised in good way, others stared eyes bulging jealous. While i returned the same observation back at them, comparing my brand of denim to theres. Then i judged, i compared  there bodies,  me looking much better in denim  then most thick legged, big booty, moms accompanied with there kids. While my co-workers are used to observing me in snug skinny jeans nothing knew to them. 

So if i seen dozens of woman walk by not caring what i looked like or notice me i would think why on earth am i wearing these rigid uncomfortable skinny jeans. Yes the wash looks great but the comfort was poor yet worth every minute from all the stares from the female single, married or out on a date. Love getting some heads turned noticing me for whatever reason which i conclude accurately or wrongly they liked what they see or very least lasting an impression. In fact some couldn't keep their eyes off my jeans until they walked away was out of sight.

 

Edited by MackyHeels

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On 11/28/2018 at 11:40 AM, bambam said:

I was out and about last night in a blazer, skinny jeans, and my Jessica Simpson stiletto platforms, and after bracing myself to get out of the car again and walk into the building, as I usually have to, I had a thought... ‘What the almighty hell am I doing???’. Any body ever get that? I have people who are very supportive, but still trying to understand why I do this to myself. Gotta be honest, I don’t know, but it keeps me going..

Yes, I have often wondered the same thing.....

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MackyHeels, a suggestion!   Why not collect all of your Hhplace posts and put them in a book?  Collectively, they would make fascinating reanding.

Edited by Bubba136

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49 minutes ago, Bubba136 said:

MackyHeels, a suggestion!   Why not collect all of your Hhplace posts and put them in a book?  Collectively, they would make fascinating reanding.

Only problem is he'd only have one chapter since the topic is always the same.

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There's an hour-long video version of this already: the soap opera. "This is McDonald Carey and these are the Days of Our Lives". You get the idea. HinH

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20 hours ago, Jkrenzer said:

Only problem is he'd only have one chapter since the topic is always the same.

Yeah, but the analyst would have a field day.

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Between the NFL and all manner of pundits covering the news and elections I have as many analysts as I can handle. HinH

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Over here we have “experts”

It's an occupation I am holding in reserve for myself should I ever come down with dementia. I know then at least I shall be able still to earn a good living as an “expert”. They are invariably well paid and are under no pressure whatsoever to be accurate or even to make any sense.

Edited by Shyheels

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The 'expert analyst' can prove anything with statistics and surveys. It's just a matter of how they word their questions for them to get the answers they want to hear and to put those answers out as facts or so called truth.

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78% of expert analysts can prove 93% of anything with 60% statistics and 40% surveys...

How'm I doin' so far?

Steve

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Which South?  The part that has running water?

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13 hours ago, JeffB said:

Yes, the story was funny.  But the misuse of the noun 'prank' as a pseudo-verb is NOT funny. :admin_rules:

Reminds me of the (much-missed) C&A clothes shops in the UK, which used a brand 'Man at C and A' for men's clothing, sometimes misrepresented to the gullible as the alleged luxury Italian label 'Manatcanda'.   

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10 minutes ago, Puffer said:

Yes, the story was funny.  But the misuse of the noun 'prank' as a pseudo-verb is NOT funny. :admin_rules:

Wow - I learned something amazing today!  And shame on Huff Post!

9D50C562-1A2F-44AC-8096-89F5FBD25363.thumb.jpeg.980529ce300d62c4e1b7106f4b581f0b.jpeg

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2 hours ago, p1ng74 said:

Wow - I learned something amazing today!  And shame on Huff Post!

I don't care what you call it - - that was good !!!

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9 hours ago, p1ng74 said:

Wow - I learned something amazing today!  And shame on Huff Post!

9D50C562-1A2F-44AC-8096-89F5FBD25363.thumb.jpeg.980529ce300d62c4e1b7106f4b581f0b.jpeg

Interesting - but a totally different use and meaning of 'prank'; never heard it used in this context in England!   

In the sense of a joke or trick, the usual form is to 'play a prank on' someone, or 'indulge/engage in a prank'.

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4 hours ago, Puffer said:

Interesting - but a totally different use and meaning of 'prank'; never heard it used in this context in England!   

In the sense of a joke or trick, the usual form is to 'play a prank on' someone, or 'indulge/engage in a prank'.

Me too, I was only familiar with the noun “prank” to mean a trick.  It was interesting to see that the dictionary didn’t include a related verb, but rather the verb meant something different altogether!

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Maybe the dictionary is pranking! Playing a prank on us! Ya think?

Fake words!

:-)

Steve

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7 hours ago, Steve63130 said:

Maybe the dictionary is pranking! Playing a prank on us! Ya think?

Fake words!

:-)

Steve

Trumped!

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Putin and the Russians, perhaps, trying to destabilise the English language. 

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Putin and company are already too late. The ghetto kids in Watts, East Palo Alto and Oakland have already succeeded in screwing up the English language years ago.

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So has Apple and Microsoft with their ludicrous spelling/grammar checks/corrects software  which appear to have been written by illiterates - especially the way they automatically insert apostrophes when one uses the plural. 

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Speaking five languages as a product of my heritage, past employment, and lifelong travels, I can tell you language continues to evolve. When a Briton starts exploring other English-speaking countries he or she may shudder at what they hear but will eventually accept it as a learning experience. I know Americans are always talking about the difference between our dialect and that in the U.K. There is a fascination with it being the origin of the present-day language and, I believe, the fact it is generally more properly spoken than here. Perhaps it is laziness over here or perhaps the educational system in Great Britain just has better results in graduation rates. 

I have noticed similar differences in Spanish and French as well. Having lived in both Spain and Venezuela and marrying a woman from Mexico have taught me those differences in Spanish. Having ties to Quebec and meeting people from France, Belgium, and Senegal have exposed me to those same differences in French.

As far as the effect of spellcheck and the penchant for many to use a sort of telegraphic code when texting I say forget it. I am concise when texting but always use proper spelling and punctuation. Spellcheck always favours the American way and I have always used British spelling to conform to a wider audience. I even did this when writing reports over my federal career. I would hear the occasional groan or laugh but when others realised I could effectively wield the language, and I was not going to change, those same people accepted it as part of the background. The ability to write and speak well in English or any other language will invariably pay dividends throughout ones's life. HappyinHeels

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I  can't agree more ! 

I am trying to resist to the everyday degradation of the French language ! 

 

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I spent my childhood in America, did my university and spent most of my adult life in Australia and have lived in England these past few years. My accent and use of idiom confuses people on occasion as I shift between various versions of English - unknowingly a lot of the time. 

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6 hours ago, HappyinHeels said:

Speaking five languages as a product of my heritage, past employment, and lifelong travels, I can tell you language continues to evolve. When a Briton starts exploring other English-speaking countries he or she may shudder at what they hear but will eventually accept it as a learning experience. I know Americans are always talking about the difference between our dialect and that in the U.K. There is a fascination with it being the origin of the present-day language and, I believe, the fact it is generally more properly spoken than here. Perhaps it is laziness over here or perhaps the educational system in Great Britain just has better results in graduation rates. 

I have noticed similar differences in Spanish and French as well. Having lived in both Spain and Venezuela and marrying a woman from Mexico have taught me those differences in Spanish. Having ties to Quebec and meeting people from France, Belgium, and Senegal have exposed me to those same differences in French.

As far as the effect of spellcheck and the penchant for many to use a sort of telegraphic code when texting I say forget it. I am concise when texting but always use proper spelling and punctuation. Spellcheck always favours the American way and I have always used British spelling to conform to a wider audience. I even did this when writing reports over my federal career. I would hear the occasional groan or laugh but when others realised I could effectively wield the language, and I was not going to change, those same people accepted it as part of the background. The ability to write and speak well in English or any other language will invariably pay dividends throughout ones's life. HappyinHeels

I agree with you on all your main points.   But, whilst I accept that hearing/reading the English language as used (and often abused!) by those outside the UK is indeed a learning experience for me, it is rarely a lesson that I would have wished to have!

I should like to think that the UK educational system is sound, at least in giving our kids a good grounding in their native language at junior school - and generally that is so.   But I shudder when I see or hear some of the semi-literate or ungrammatical efforts of present-day teachers, who often totally fail to set the necessary good example when, for example, marking homework or writing school reports.   Such sloppiness would not have arisen, or been tolerated, when I was being taught the basics sometime in the last century; I well remember the fundamentals effectively imparted in my lessons at the age of 5 or 6.

You are absolutely right that a good command of one's own language is vital if one is to succeed in any profession or occupation.   That is true even if one's chosen path has a high numerate or technical content, such as in accountancy, engineering or computer science.   The essence of success is invariably effective communication - and that means effective use of language.

On the subject of schools and effective communication, there is a tale of a headmaster who wrote in a boy's report: 'He sets himself a low standard and consistently fails to reach it.'   The boy's parents took this to be a compliment!

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They have quit teaching cursive writing here in the United States.  It’s no wonder we have an entire generation growing up with no good sense of aesthetics, which applies to fashion.  

Edited by p1ng74

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