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Puffer

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Everything posted by Puffer

  1. I bought these elegant Tailingjia sandals on an impulse recently but have decided not to keep them. They are labelled as US14/Eu44/UK11 and fit my UK11 feet but would be a better fit on UK10/USM11 feet. They are black patent with 5.2" stiletto heel and 0.4" platform; the back zip is functional (needed to put them on). The construction is sturdy and they are unmarked - tried on only. I would be happy to sell them for £25.00 (inc UK postage) - extra if to be sent overseas. Link to manufacturer here: https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32687123992.html?spm=2114.12010612.8148356.17.369
  2. I have one pair from MJ - 5" heel and a perfect fit for me. As you say, rather heavy but well made. These are my boots - similar to the Omanos but more pointed:
  3. Easier still is to shape a piece of softwood to fit the cavity and wedge/glue it in. Then add glued-on rubber or composition heel piece, preferably also nailed into wood with brass nails.
  4. I am pretty sure that Omano became Extreme HH, otherwise known as Estres Modes: https://extremehighheels.net/es/15-zapatos-de-tacon The product range does not currently seem to consist of much other than stilettos; the Omano-style boots worn by Pierre (which have a very acceptable male look) don't appear. For my money (and less of it is needed), Miguel Jones (Cowboy Boots USA) would be a good source of bespoke boots like Pierre's.
  5. I like wearing the Berkemann sandals below - cool and comfortable in the warmer weather. Despite the wooden soles, they are light (lighter than Scholls). But one does have to be wary of them coming off in awkward places (such as descending a flight of steps). The similar Birkenstock Madrid style is easier to keep on. I also like the Birkenstock Piazza sandals - now discontinued and never made in larger sizes; mine are modified from the otherwise identical Mayari style by removing the strap across the instep.
  6. I had better spell-out my own 'shoe hates', namely: Heels that have a significantly flaired base; high heels set right at the back; cone heels; platforms thicker than 0.5" (except perhaps on a rugged boot with cleated sole); very round or very square toeboxes; sandals with pointed open toes; shoes or sandals with thick or multiple straps; anything with a 'peep toe' (as distinct from an open front showing at least three toes and preferably all); lace-ups (except perhaps Oxfords with a high slim heel); flip flops in rubber or plastic (however expensive!); Crocs; Uggs; most Birkenstocks (apa
  7. I'm not so sure of the 'fetish' aspect. When Rosa started (at least 25 years ago), its aim was to provide shoes to women 'who like the highest of heels' at a time when stilettos, let alone high stilettos, were not readily available. The range was limited and there were quality issues. Subsequently, a new supplier was found and the extreme pointed toes were introduced - and later the options of more rounded toes and platforms. The impractical hobble skirts and other items seemed to be a spin-off; clearly, Sarah liked such skirts herself. The marketing has always been restrained, letti
  8. Nice outfit - but I'm not sure whether hairy arms go with that look!
  9. Roger and Sarah Adams ('Rosa' shoes) were briefly members here. They rapidly left when they realised the extent of male interest in their products, and in wearing heels generally. Their business was originally in Brighton, not far from where I then lived, and I met them more than once. Sarah sometimes wore her extreme heels around the town, and most of the videos are shot in that area. A nice enough couple but clearly not supportive of our aims. Their attitude towards Joe doesn't surprise me one bit, not that I agree with it. The business seems to have suffered recently with the lo
  10. That is interesting. I have a small 'lump' just above one heel, which I think arose after I shut a farm gate into the back of my ankle many years ago, badly bruising the tendon (but, fortunately, doing nothing worse). It gives me no trouble and doesn't seem to rub against any footwear.
  11. I'm not sure whether I envy your tiny feet, but I do envy the choice of shoes open to you!
  12. Nice shoes, but I recall that owners of these Lois courts consistently complained that they ran small by at least one size. What size are yours, and are they the size you usually wear?
  13. Which reminds me of one of my Grandfather's puzzles: Where in the British Isles do men weigh least? Answer: There are men of Ayr in Scotland and men of Cork in Ireland - but lightermen on the Thames!
  14. There are two sure signs that one is getting on in years. The first is that one's memory starts to fail ... but I can't remember what the second one is.
  15. The Syro boots are just ugly! The ASOS variant are not much better, although heeled boots in large sizes are always welcome. I see that these ASOS boots are shown as not currently available in sizes 46 and 47. Does that mean that they have been very popular, or simply that supply was limited? However, the UK website still has the full range to size UK12. (I am doubtful, however, that the heel is the 5" claimed.)
  16. According to the home page, worldwide shipping is a flat-rate 12 euros per pair, which doesn't seem excessive to me. But I have had no dealings with the business.
  17. I like those, especially with the pointed toe and centre seam! I'm guessing the heel is close to 3". Not really - Beatle boots have a Cuban heel rather than a block heel (and ASOS does have Cuban heel styles too) Yes - there are in fact several ASOS men's boots with heels. You have to be fairly liberal with search parameters to find them all.
  18. This promo video for Louboutin 'Trouble in Heaven' perfume is worth watching! (I have to say, however, that I prefer women with a few more curves.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_6MZW-2OaU
  19. I can well understand your disappointment. Quite apart from clearly NOT being what you ordered, the style and wearability is simply not right. When will these makers learn?
  20. ... and especially when the discussion is led by someone who has an approach that is both empirical and literate. (Yes, mlroseplant, that means you!)
  21. Crotch-high waders (flat heels) might be more fun!
  22. Agreed on all counts, although I'm not convinced that composite necessarily has twice the overall durability compared with properly-treated and laid wooden decking - but time will tell. I don't think the products available in the UK have improved much in recent years. Framing is certainly a key issue - not only properly treated but of appropriate strength and spacing to give adequate support. Foundations for the framing must be carefully considered too (depending upon the ground or other surface beneath), or the whole decking area can sag or undulate. I speak from bitter experience
  23. A point I didn't make before (because it is not really relevant in the UK) is that composite decking might well be preferable in those areas of the US (or elsewhere) where attack by insects such as termites or other pests is likely. And, as mlroseplant says, no decking is likely to be stiletto-friendly, regardless of its composition or construction.
  24. In my UK experience, very little shrinkage of treated decking boards has occurred except in the hottest and driest weather - and we rarely get enough of that for a long period! A small gap (say 1/8" for a 4" board) is about right. As to composite boards, the limited annual maintenance and clean appearance are plus points but the material can sag or warp and certainly does expand at end (butt) joints rather more than wood. Its strength may be an issue too - it can be soft (watch those heels!) or prone to breaking away if edges or ends are not properly supported or reinforced. All told,
  25. Oh, thank goodness for that clarification! For one minute, I thought I had come round from a coma and found that we had JC for PM. As if there weren't enough problems already facing the country ...
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