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Puffer

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Puffer last won the day on May 16

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About Puffer

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    Getting Warmed Up

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    Male
  • Country
    Kent, England
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    DIY

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  1. How on earth can you fit your USM14 feet into a USW12 shoe? That's a difference equivalent to four sizes; USM14 would normally equate to USW16. (There's a lot of us here who would like to know your secret - and put it into practice!)
  2. Renee's sandals were the only thing worth looking at there.
  3. I hope it works out for you. I suppose you couldn't say no when offered a 'high yield' project (or perhaps you misheard?)!
  4. Or was it 'good jeans'?
  5. Some interesting comment there, but not entirely in accordance with my distinct recollection of the contemporary situation in the UK, although I will accept that it is all too easy to focus on the highlights rather than the mundane realities of life. I stand by what I wrote elsewhere on this board recently: 'My memory of heels seen regularly in public in the (southern) UK in the late 50s - mid 60s was that 3 - 4" stiletto heels were everywhere, and worn by women of all ages. But 4 - 5" was by no means unusual; there were many styles in the high street shops and worn for both work and dressier occasions, again by women of all ages. Yes, shoes with a heel above 4.5" were not in every shop window and closet but they certainly existed - and none had platforms before around 1970. Happy memories!' If one looks at the newspapers, newsreels, films, mail-order catalogues etc of that 'golden age', there is ample evidence of what I said was the situation - although I think there were some distinct differences between the UK and the US, with more restraint by women in the US as to what they wore. From observation, it seems as though US women took more pains to look 'elegant' in formal and semi-formal settings and had (or took) more opportunities to 'dress up', boosted by somewhat greater disposable income. But (film stars and the like aside), the typical US 'matron' at (say) a dinner party, restaurant or theatre would be less likely to wear the revealing dresses, tight skirts and 4"+ heels that were considered acceptable (and desirable) by a wide range of women in the UK. However, that was not everyday working or home-making attire for most women, although there was certainly a greater adoption of dressy rather than casual clothing - stockings, skirts and (modest) heels were almost universal unless precluded for reasons of safety or comfort. So, we see stilettos of at least 3" and up to 4" worn almost everywhere for many different activities by women of between (say) 15 and 60, including schoolgirls (out of uniform) and housewives buying the groceries. And I would emphasise that there were (mercifully) absolutely no platforms - they had disappeared by around 1950 and were not to reappear before 1970, then to create the illusion of much greater height-gain for a given rise. Although significantly higher and thinner heels are (allegedly) currently less fashionable if not unfashionable, they are certainly still available in UK high street shops, quite apart from those widely offered online. I was recently in a large shopping mall where at least three shops stocked shoes and sandals with 4.5 - 5" stiletto heels (and little or no platform) alongside the equivalents with chunkier heels of anything from 2" to 5", again often with little or no platform. With the longer boots, however, there seemed to be a definite trend towards chunkier, but still often high, 'stacked' heels, although modest stiletto ankle boots were still on offer alongside their thicker-heeled counterparts. (Lots of wearable heeled boots for men to consider, if their feet were small enough!)
  6. See below: You have your answer - but I would respect (and admire) your choice if you did.
  7. Would you wear boots like that on your Costa jaunts?
  8. I agree that the 'artistic impressions' shown in most adverts of the late 50s - late 60s suggested that heels were much higher than the reality. Was this intentional, as an accurate drawing (or, better, a photo) would have not been an encouragement to those who wanted truly 'high' heels? Equally, would those women who would not be comfortable (physically or conceptually) in heels above, say, 4" be deterred from buying otherwise likeable shoes because they appeared too high in the ads? My memory of heels seen regularly in public in the (southern) UK in the late 50s - mid 60s was that 3 - 4" stiletto heels were everywhere, and worn by women of all ages. But 4 - 5" was by no means unusual; there were many styles in the high street shops and worn for both work and dressier occasions, again by women of all ages. Yes, shoes with a heel above 4.5" were not in every shop window and closet but they certainly existed - and none had platforms before around 1970. Happy memories!
  9. Thank you - but nothing there that would fit me (Eu45/46) is either appealing or affordable.
  10. ... and otiose. (Now, there's a self-descriptive, if not self-destructive, word.)
  11. Tautology reigns! They are 'metal-heeled shoes ' (or, more accurately, sandals)! Or just 'metal heels'. Goes along with 'PIN number', where the 'N' means 'number'. Nice style though!
  12. Alas, there is not (and has not been) any true equivalent to Payless in the UK. (I have been to Florida three times and a visit to Payless there was rewarding.) It is almost impossible to find anything of reasonable quality and fit in larger sizes (UK10 or greater) 'off the shelf' here, affordable or otherwise, and most internet sources are risky in terms of fit, if not quality. I don't ask for much: a modest selection of non-extreme boots, loafers and sandals in UK11-12 that can be comfortably and discreetly worn in public and don't break the bank.
  13. Unless a clearly-specified 'service charge' is shown on the menu before ordering, it cannot lawfully be charged. And, even if it is correctly added, it can be challenged (reduced/removed) if the 'service' was deficient. I agree that such a removal is rarely sought (or indeed necessary), but the better solution, as you say, is to outlaw mandatory/expected tipping and leave this entirely to the customer's discretion as a means of rewarding exceptional service - as we are all entitled to expect good service as an included part of the deal. (I'm thinking here of service and tipping in all business activity - reastaurants, taxis, hairdressers, etc.) Likewise: a couple of occasions when a very long wait for order-taking or food arrival was totally ridiculous and another occasion when cold and poorly-prepared food was served. There have been a very few times too when, having entered an establishment without looking properly at the menu, I have walked out on realising that nothing on offer (or its pricing) was to my liking - my fault and best corrected immediately.
  14. I think he would like it more if you were wearing a goose outfit - with the promise of laying a golden egg!
  15. Vinheel: those last sandals look very nice, if a bit too decorative for my taste.
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