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A toilet is not a facility, but a porcelain god one "prays" to after consuming inferno salsa.  It is kept in a water closet which you might call a loo.

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You left out restrooms, and of course bano for the southern tier of states...   smile....    sf

"Why should girls have all the fun!!"

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8 hours ago, Cali said:

A toilet is not a facility, but a porcelain god one "prays" to after consuming inferno salsa.  It is kept in a water closet which you might call a loo.

In the UK (and other civilised English-speaking territories), the 'facility' is commonly (and politely) called a 'toilet', 'lavatory', 'loo', '[public] convenience'; occasionally a 'W.C.'.    The porcelain item is a lavatory/WC pan. 🚽  

Other names are many and varied but I will not embarrass you (or myself) by listing them here - apart from the self-descriptive 'bog'.  :blush:

I agree that the archaic name for the room containing the appliance is/was a 'water closet' (hence 'W.C.') but that is no longer used outside a historical reference.  :reading:

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French slang for the "facilities" was (possibly still is), in bad phonetics: "le vaysay". Which is how the letters WC might be pronounced in French.

Incidentally the term "crap" predates Thomas Crapper, the famous maker of water closets.

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32 minutes ago, Puffer said:

In the UK (and other civilised English-speaking territories), the 'facility' is commonly (and politely) called a 'toilet', 'lavatory', 'loo', '[public] convenience'; occasionally a 'W.C.'.    The porcelain item is a lavatory/WC pan. 🚽  

Other names are many and varied but I will not embarrass you (or myself) by listing them here - apart from the self-descriptive 'bog'.  :blush:

I agree that the archaic name for the room containing the appliance is/was a 'water closet' (hence 'W.C.') but that is no longer used outside a historical reference.  :reading:

Asia has taken that term (W.C.) over, so it lives on! Here in the U.S., you will invariably see signs labeling it as a "restroom," but nobody calls it that in real life, except for perhaps old people. On the other hand, there are only three one-holers at my work for a building that is a quarter of a mile long, and when you need to go, the one that you've just walked a considerable distance to get to is always occupied. Perhaps people really are resting in there.

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54 minutes ago, Puffer said:

I agree that the archaic name for the room containing the appliance is/was a 'water closet' (hence 'W.C.') but that is no longer used outside a historical reference.  :reading:

I see W.C. on building plans all the time.

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11 hours ago, Cali said:

I see W.C. on building plans all the time.

I was referring to UK usage.   Whilst the term 'water closet' (strictly, the room or cubicle  containing the 'facility') is very rarely, if ever, met nowadays, the usual UK terms for the porcelain pan/cistern in the building trade are WC or toilet.

As at9 says, Thomas Crapper's suggestive name is no more than that; he got the credit (blame?) for something established well before his time.

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12 minutes ago, Puffer said:

I was referring to UK usage.   Whilst the term 'water closet' (strictly, the room or cubicle  containing the 'facility') is very rarely, if ever, met nowadays, the usual UK terms for the porcelain pan/cistern in the building trade are WC or toilet.

As at9 says, Thomas Crapper's suggestive name is no more than that; he got the credit (blame?) for something established well before his time.

I was playing with you with the term W.C. I don't use it but I am looking at building plans, and W.C. is all over them.

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1 minute ago, Cali said:

I was playing with you with W.C. I don't use it but I am looking a building plans its all over them.

Yes, understood - but thanks!   It is similarly used on plans here.

I forgot to mention the old story about the couple who were enquiring about renting a country cottage for a holiday in Wales.   They were put off by the owner's property details telling them 'The nearest WC is about two miles away as the crow flies, or five if you don't use the ferry'.   ('WC' is also a common abbreviation for 'Wesleyan Chapel'.)

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