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The High Heeled Ruminations Of Melrose Plant


mlroseplant
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My daughters say that when a gal or guy is seen struggling in heels that are the incorrect size or just been on too long, they are doing the "T-Rex walk."  

I have seen it many times, funny and sad at the same time.  smile...   sf

"Why should girls have all the fun!!"

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Farmer's Market outfit of the week. The weather has been very strange this year. For the month of May, it seemed like it was either really hot or really cold. We hit shorts wearing weather the second week of May, but then for the next few weeks it was in the 50s for highs (lower 10s C). As a result, I let my legs go for 3+ weeks. That was a tactical error. What is normally a 5-7 minute process turned into a 15 minute endeavor, it was kind of a hatchet job, and it made me run late. At least the farmer's market is not the type of place where people notice that you've missed a couple of patches of hair on the side of your thigh.

I chose to wear mid heels on this particular night, one of my three pairs of Söfft Calvados, which have a 3 inch total rise (3 3/4" heel with 3/4" platform). True to form, they didn't bite back, and it was like working in flats. In fact, when we got home, I didn't bother to change shoes for the unload like I usually do.

Shorts are Banana Republic, t-shirt is by some unfortunate in Vietnam, quite possibly named Baby Three. I only got one comment, and that was from an old lady who was using a walker. I stepped out from behind the table in order to serve her, and she said something to the effect of, "I don't see how you can work this market in those shoes. Even back when I was waitressing, I always wore flats, and my feet still killed me." I kind of deflected the subject a bit, and found out she was working at Costco part time, giving out samples. Next time I am at Costco, I'll have to look for her.

I honestly don't know what to tell people any more. I do bring backup flat(ter) shoes with me, just in case. I've never had to use them in a year and a half of doing this. I guarantee you that if I ever forgot them, or decided, "Nah, I don't need these!", that would be the one time something would go wrong somehow.

FMKhakiShortsCalvados.jpg

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There's an easier solution to leg hair. I have to tape my legs to do some winter sports, so I have been waxing my legs for a few years. Hair and K-Tape do not work together and I hate stubble. My last wax was in March and you can hardly see any hair.  A combination of the hair getting lighter in color, thinner in size, and less overall.  The woman next to me getting a pedi this pass week remarked how nice and tan my legs were.  And the pain...it gets easier and easier.

Edited by Cali
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I never wear boots that I can't work in.  I climb ladders, move furniture, and unload boxes in my boots with 4" heels.  I don't know if I could keep that up in anything higher so I think that's the sweet spot for me.  

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I have worn 4" to work a farmer's market before. In fact, according to my notes, I have done so three times this year. Twice have I worn 3", and the other two times I wore 3 1/2". None of them have been true stilettos, and about half of them were wedges. There is only one pair that I won't be wearing again for that purpose. I doubt that I will go over 4" for this event, although sometimes it's tempting, just to see if I can pull it off.

What I have found is that only the Söfft sandals, pictured three replies above, actually feel like flats. The rest of them, when worn for 5 hours of mostly standing, produce discomfort under the ball of the foot from friction. I believe that this is because there is usually a seam there in the footbed on most shoes. Most sandals, anyway. It's not a musculoskeletal thing for me, it's a skin thing. It's like I've walked too far on concrete barefoot when I'm not used to it, that sort of a feeling. I believe it is simply a matter of toughening up my feet. Ever since I stopped using the treadmill on a regular basis, my feet have gotten soft.

It does seem that as the weeks go by, it gets easier every time, but the Söfft sandals are the only ones where I don't even notice I'm wearing shoes, much less heels. No wonder I have 3 pair--4 if you count the ratty, worn-out pair that I still keep for some reason.

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That's quite the record you have. I have no clue what I've worn or when. After a few days, the memory fades and I've never jotted down my choices. I know which are my favorites and seem to rotate amongst them most.

Sounds to me like Söfft has become your favorite brand based on comfort. 

I don't get the sandal seam placement. Seems if the could move just a bit forward would help. Realize they need the tip to be rounded into the sole unlike pumps for better structural protection, but seam is in a bad place.

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Same for me. The ball skin hurts after a few hours. Or a few miles walk. Depending on the material of the socks it could make a big difference. Long distance bare foot is a no way for me 

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4 hours ago, Pierre1961 said:

Same for me. The ball skin hurts after a few hours. Or a few miles walk. Depending on the material of the socks it could make a big difference. Long distance bare foot is a no way for me 

Can't wear socks in sandals.

I don't wear open toed sandals due to my toe nails. At 59, they just haven't held up.

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Socks with sandals? Please no.  I only wear socks with closed toe shoes shoes, which was about once in the last two months. At 67 its sandals with pads. I'm lucky, my toe nails are in get (typo should be "great") shape.

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11 minutes ago, Cali said:

Socks with sandals? Please no.  I only wear socks with closed toe shoes shoes, which was about once in the last two months. At 67 its sandals with pads. I'm lucky, my toe nails are in get shape.

You are  luck at that. You have oddly small nails, that has to help.

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1 hour ago, Jkrenzer said:

You are  luck at that. You have oddly small nails, that has to help.

I've had work done. Both big toes have had ingrown nail surgery. I also had a hammertoe bone removal in the second smallest toe and tendon release/realignment in the adjacent baby toe with 8 inch pins inserted.

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21 hours ago, Jkrenzer said:

That's quite the record you have. I have no clue what I've worn or when. After a few days, the memory fades and I've never jotted down my choices. I know which are my favorites and seem to rotate amongst them most.

Sounds to me like Söfft has become your favorite brand based on comfort. 

I don't get the sandal seam placement. Seems if the could move just a bit forward would help. Realize they need the tip to be rounded into the sole unlike pumps for better structural protection, but seam is in a bad place.

I don't usually record that stuff the way JeffB used to (and probably still does). I only started writing down what I wore to the Thursday night "big" farmer's market because of two reasons: 1) Since it is a bit hard on the feet, I need to remember what not to wear, and what to wear. 2) Seems I have a bit of a reputation, and I don't want to accidentally repeat too often.

I have not recently done a shoe inventory, but pretty much all of my low heels are Söfft brand. I haven't had a perfect record with them, but I've had a pretty good one. One of these days, I shall have to do a little segment on that part of my collection.

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OOTW. I don't really have an outfit of the day, but I usually have an outfit of the week. The Via Spiga pumps are fitting a lot better after going through the shoe stretcher. I got complimented on my shoes by a fellow musician, one whom I had never met before. I was not in my best form, but she was. That is, as I was reminded again by a sometimes friend, because I don't do music for a living. If I did, I would probably practice more. I also got accused of having man-boobs within the next few hours. I don't know why this bothers me. I only wish they were bigger. Just kidding.

 

SilverPumpsChurch.jpg

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Man boobs??  You need to stop pumping iron...  smile....   sf

"Why should girls have all the fun!!"

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Farmer's market OOTW. Bruno Magli suede wedges (which are holding up rather better than I expected), Loft shorts, Walmart t-shirt. Did not get any comment on my shoes, but one male customer, appearing to be in his early 20s, complimented my shorts. It is quite possible that he never even saw my shoes. I'm not sure they're visible to customers unless they go out of their way to view them.

Although they appear shorter in this particular picture, these sandals are right a 4" with no platform. I wore them six weeks ago, and by the end of the night, I was ready to get out of them. This week, however, they treated me much better. They were just fine. It's probably more like I'm getting my endurance built back up. And yes, the photo was taken in a men's bathroom.

BMPinkShorts.jpg

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OOTW...   I'm not "hip," (sadly) and had to look up the meaning of OOTW.  Four plus definitions came up.  One was "Operations Other Than War," I imagine that was not your meaning here.  

Nice sandals and I'm not a shorts wearing guy but do like that coral color.  I have a casual shirt that color and it is also my fav OPI nail polish color.

Have fun...   smile...  sf 

"Why should girls have all the fun!!"

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21 hours ago, SF said:

OOTW...   I'm not "hip," (sadly) and had to look up the meaning of OOTW.  Four plus definitions came up.  One was "Operations Other Than War," I imagine that was not your meaning here.  

Nice sandals and I'm not a shorts wearing guy but do like that coral color.  I have a casual shirt that color and it is also my fav OPI nail polish color.

Have fun...   smile...  sf 

I had defined that abbreviation three posts previous. I am normally loathe to use those sorts of things, but I have read this so often when I receive pictures from my fashionista friend that it now seems normal to me. Only with her, it's always OOTD. I simply don't have a different outfit every day, so I went with OOTW. In fact, I don't know if you could call most of what I wear "outfits." It's more like "stuff I pulled on at the last minute that I hoped wouldn't look terrible."

Operations Other Than War might have actually worked in this case. After all, our operation is quite peaceful there on 5th Street every week.

18 hours ago, p1ng74 said:

Engineers are always inventing acronyms, and I think this is one he created - Outfit Of The Week

I'm going to tag @Puffer on this one, because this is probably right up his alley. I didn't actually invent this "acronym." Or maybe I did. As I'm sure you are quite aware, being a fashion enthusiast yourself, OOTD is as common as dirt on many social media platforms. Like I said previously, I had to change it to reflect one-seventh the frequency.

On a slightly different subject, we call these things "acronyms," but they are not truly acronyms. That definition may be changing as people, including me, slightly misuse it, but what we really mean is "initialism." To be a true acronym, the initials must form a sort of word that you say, kind of like "LASER, SCOTUS, SCUBA," that sort of thing. An initialism is an abbreviation where you say the letters, like "FBI, DIY," and quite possibly "OOTD." OOTD is an interesting one, though, because at least as I use it, it's only in writing, as "Outfit Of The Day" rolls off the tongue quite easily, perhaps rather more easily than saying, "oh-oh-tee-dee." "Eff-bee-eye" is obviously more handy than saying "Federal Bureau of Investigation" every single time.

I could go on to examine the fact that Americans will call air-conditioning "A/C," whereas Brits will tend to say "aircon." Both are shortened forms, and some might point out the the initialism "A/C" might be mistaken for "Alternating Current," whereas "aircon" cannot. However, in real life, this never happens. Y'all ave a good day.

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Posted (edited)

I'm a pretty casual enthusiast, so the only abbreviation I see regularly is WIWT.  

This is why I love this forum.  I have worked for a company for 11 years whose name is literally an initialism.  Tragically, in my entire time there I have never heard anyone call an initialism what it is, and abuse of the definition of acronym is rampant.  This ends now... thanks for the reality check!  

Edited by p1ng74
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2 hours ago, mlroseplant said:

...

I'm going to tag @Puffer on this one, because this is probably right up his alley. I didn't actually invent this "acronym." Or maybe I did. As I'm sure you are quite aware, being a fashion enthusiast yourself, OOTD is as common as dirt on many social media platforms. Like I said previously, I had to change it to reflect one-seventh the frequency.

On a slightly different subject, we call these things "acronyms," but they are not truly acronyms. That definition may be changing as people, including me, slightly misuse it, but what we really mean is "initialism." To be a true acronym, the initials must form a sort of word that you say, kind of like "LASER, SCOTUS, SCUBA," that sort of thing. An initialism is an abbreviation where you say the letters, like "FBI, DIY," and quite possibly "OOTD." OOTD is an interesting one, though, because at least as I use it, it's only in writing, as "Outfit Of The Day" rolls off the tongue quite easily, perhaps rather more easily than saying, "oh-oh-tee-dee." "Eff-bee-eye" is obviously more handy than saying "Federal Bureau of Investigation" every single time.

I could go on to examine the fact that Americans will call air-conditioning "A/C," whereas Brits will tend to say "aircon." Both are shortened forms, and some might point out the the initialism "A/C" might be mistaken for "Alternating Current," whereas "aircon" cannot. However, in real life, this never happens. Y'all ave a good day.

How can I not respond, although I'm not entirely sure what pearls of wisdom you expect me to add to your explanation of the various types of somewhat disparate abbreviation?

In my book, an acronym is as you say - initial (or more) letters forming a pronounceable word.  ('Radar' is an example of the latter: ra(dio) d(etection) a(nd) r(anging), where two letters in 'radio' are both used.)   Sometimes, not all letters are used (particularly if representing  conjunctions), as in NASA - which would be NAASA if the 'and' was also represented.

An initialism (such as FBI or BBC) uses initial letters (and sometimes others) and they are pronounced separately.   They may be separated by full stops (periods) but that once-universal convention is increasingly ditched.

A basic abbreviation (sometimes called a contraction) is simply a shortened form of a word in which certain letters apart from the first (and often the last) are omitted, as in 'Dr' (doctor) or St (street or saint).   Here again, the convention of always adding a full stop (period) after such is no longer as common as it once was, particularly when both the first and last letters appear.   (I am aware that it remains common in the US (or U.S.!) for the stops to be included.)

A contraction (properly so-called) is a combination of two words into one, where one or more letters are omitted and represented by an apostrophe, as in don't for does not.

In my UK experience, we would usually say aircon but write either aircon or A/C the control in a car is usually labelled A/C.  We use AC as an initialism for alternating current and often use A/C to mean account.

There is quite a lot more that could be said about these and other forms of abbreviation - but I guess you have had quite enough excitement for one day.

TTFN,

Puffer

[TTFN is possibly unknown outside the British Empire.   It stands for 'Ta-ta for now', i.e. 'Goodbye for the present', and I believe was a catchphrase originating in a wartime radio comedy programme.]

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17 hours ago, SF said:

cartoon

Ha ha!   I don't recognise the cartoon, but interesting that it seems to be better known outside the UK than I expected.

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2 hours ago, Puffer said:

Ha ha!   I don't recognise the cartoon, but interesting that it seems to be better known outside the UK than I expected.

I might have figured SF would provide a link to Tigger from Winnie-the-Pooh. I can't say as I am surprised that you don't recognize the Disney animated version, as it bears (no pun intended) little resemblance to A.A. Milne's books, especially in that few second clip.

One interesting abbreviation I have run across is the initialism LED, or Light Emitting Diode. Or I should say, it's an initialism here, but in Asia, everyone seems to pronounce it as a word, making it an acronym.

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Twinkle, twinkle little LED

How I wonder if you're dead.

This side of The Pond we say it as both the word LED and "ell ee dee".

The wiki entry for TTFN https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TTFN states what I believe is the correct origin, the BBC WW2 radio comedy "It's that man again", usually abbreviated to ITMA. The Winnie the Pooh film reference is given (it's not in the books) but the surprise was its use in Batman in 1966.

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TTFN.  Not the most popular way to say goodbye, but it was used by some (including me and friends) out here on the west coast back in the 80's.  

Not so much anymore, but folks, at least the ones I asked, still know what it means.  

Oh well, Happy Fourth of July all, and enjoy your heels...  smile...  TTFN

sf

PS I never cared much for Tigger, but my kids loved the character back then.  

"Why should girls have all the fun!!"

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10 hours ago, at9 said:

Twinkle, twinkle little LED

How I wonder if you're dead.

This side of The Pond we say it as both the word LED and "ell ee dee".

The wiki entry for TTFN https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TTFN states what I believe is the correct origin, the BBC WW2 radio comedy "It's that man again", usually abbreviated to ITMA. The Winnie the Pooh film reference is given (it's not in the books) but the surprise was its use in Batman in 1966.

10 hours ago, mlroseplant said:

I might have figured SF would provide a link to Tigger from Winnie-the-Pooh. I can't say as I am surprised that you don't recognize the Disney animated version, as it bears (no pun intended) little resemblance to A.A. Milne's books, especially in that few second clip.

One interesting abbreviation I have run across is the initialism LED, or Light Emitting Diode. Or I should say, it's an initialism here, but in Asia, everyone seems to pronounce it as a word, making it an acronym.

I've never heard anyone in the UK call an LED a 'led', but no doubt some do.

Yes, 'TTFN' did indeed feature prominently in ITMA and I'm sure that was indeed its origin.   There were a number of other catchphrases in that extremely popular programme, most of which have survived, even though used by people who (like me) were born well after the programme last aired.   I blame my late parents (both fans of ITMA) ...

As to 'Tigger', I should perhaps have recognised the character and the setting but have never seen the film - perhaps just as well.

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It is another mystery of life as to why some shoes are more comfortable than others. Sometimes this defies logic. This week, I wore the most outrageous shoes I've ever worn to work a farmer's market--my Miu Miu navy blue wooden sandals. I say most outrageous because it's the first time I've worn really high heels with shorts, and the numbers are there--5 1/2" heel with 1 1/4" platform.

I did bring backup shoes just in case, and I have to admit that I did the setup in the backup shoes, which were a 2" wedge heeled Söfft sandal which are the same as flats in my estimation. Then I switched to the wooden heels to remove the car from the area, park it, and walk back to get started for the night. Amazingly enough, I never had to use the backup shoes. I even tore down and drove home in the high shoes. Previous to this, I had never worn them for more than about 2 hours at a time, and not standing. This time, it was 5 hours, 4+ of which was standing or walking. And it wasn't bad!

Here's the thing that defies logic. These sandals are solid wood, except for the leather strap and a bit of a rubber sole. Your foot rests directly on the wood. No padding, no nothing. Many times, heavily padded shoes do worse. I am not convinced that heavy padding = comfort, unlike what most people say.

Here is a mirror selfie from the nearby men's room, and a shot from underneath the canopy looking out at customers.

MiuMiuBlueFM.jpg

VJFM7:7:22.jpg

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