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The Jaunts of JeffB!

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Get up offa dat thing !!!   ha ha    sf

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On 11/26/2019 at 4:52 PM, Puffer said:

At Christmas, there are others who could say the same, Jeff!         image.png.4c66f3aa7fc8c1f3040de320b0fbd33e.png

 

You British are so much more humo(u)rous than us Yanks in the most subtle ways. Subtlety is not an American strength, in general.

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9 hours ago, mlroseplant said:

You British are so much more humo(u)rous than us Yanks in the most subtle ways. Subtlety is not an American strength, in general.

I'd like to think that we are indeed more subtle.   Our proper use and application of the English language is a factor, of course. :study:

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Some English may appropriately apply the language, but Britain is not full of only the English. It's a small place and languages and/or context vary greatly over very short distances. 

Language is an evolutionary thing, it's not meant to continue without change. I'm sure Shakespeare would be appalled at the way proper English is spoken today.

Edited by Jkrenzer

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This rare colour footage of Flanders and Swann was recorded in the US.

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17 hours ago, Puffer said:

I'd like to think that we are indeed more subtle.   Our proper use and application of the English language is a factor, of course. :study:

A long, long time ago, I once worked with a guy from London. I suppose you might call him an "East Ender." We were wiring a television broadcast antenna, and this guy traveled all over the world supervising this type of work. I was an apprentice electrician at the time, loaned out to him from my company for a couple of weeks. He was wicked smart, and probably the best at his job, but he did not use anything approaching proper English. He dropped Hs where they ought to be, and inserted them where they ought not to be. His grammar was atrocious. He also had a way with expletives. He used words that I had never heard before, and haven't heard since. He could use 20 vulgar words in a row without repeating any of them. He was a hoot to work with. Grumpy as hell, but knew and appreciated a quality worker when he saw him. I hope to work with a guy like that again someday before I retire.

Edited by mlroseplant
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8 hours ago, Jkrenzer said:

Some English may appropriately apply the language, but Britain is not full of only the English. It's a small place and languages and/or context vary greatly over very short distances. 

Language is an evolutionary thing, it's not meant to continue without change. I'm sure Shakespeare would be appalled at the way proper English is spoken today.

My point was really that the British are very good at using the subtlety and richness of their language to express themselves - and that is particularly evident in their humourous writing and speaking.   In that sense I consider that they perform better than Americans - but I am naturally biased in that I cannot closely identify with what is native to (or preferred by) a typical Yank. 

I don't regard Shakespeare (or Chaucer) as providing a sound benchmark for the English language.   What they used, or were familiar with, has necessarily evolved over several centuries and will continue to do so - but not as swiftly as some would wish or attempt to achieve.

8 hours ago, mlroseplant said:

A long, long time ago, I once worked with a guy from London. I suppose you might call him an "East Ender." We were wiring a television broadcast antenna, and this guy traveled all over the world supervising this type of work. I was an apprentice electrician at the time, loaned out to him from my company for a couple of weeks. He was wicked smart, and probably the best at his job, but he did not use anything approaching proper English. He dropped Hs where they ought to be, and inserted them where they ought not to be. His grammar was atrocious. He also had a way with expletives. He used words that I had never heard before, and haven't heard since. He could use 20 vulgar words in a row without repeating any of them. He was a hoot to work with. Grumpy as hell, but knew and appreciated a quality worker when he saw him. I hope to work with a guy like that again someday before I retire.

We must be careful here not to confuse writing (and indeed speaking) in what is generally considered to be good grammatical English with local variations of a dialectical or accented nature.   Within the UK, there are of course many distinct areas where the indiginous population shows variation in the way it speaks or writes, whilst generally adopting the same English language with all its usual 'rules'.   Each area will have words or expressions that may be quite alien to others brought up only a few miles away, or an accent which is 'different' and not always easy to understand.   Add in the people who have come to Britain from all over the world, very often not having English as their first language, and there is indeed great variety and an element of evolution in the language as a whole.   We have for centuries willingly imported words from other languages and cultures when it suits us - all part of our rich linguistic tapestry.   But the fundamental rules of grammar, spelling, punctuation etc do not change overnight and nor should they; otherwise communication will break down.   I have little doubt that the position in the US is very similar.   The 'standard' English used in the two countries is of course essentially the same but exhibits some distinct differences, especially in construction and spelling.   Neither is totally 'right' or 'wrong' and each has borrowed from the other over time, but not always to advantage.   

As to the (allegedly) Cockney bloke (he was never a 'guy' - we don't have them!), I have little doubt that he would find the typical Yank's use of language equally strange and quite possibly impenetrable at times.   And he might have been exaggerating just a little as a 'wind-up' - another thing we are very good at when 'foreigners' are around!   When in Rome ...

Edited by Puffer
correcting speling - I mean 'spelling'

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11 minutes ago, Puffer said:

....... (he was never a 'guy' - we don't have them!),......

Oh yes we do! Mr Fawkes.

My reply contains a reference to the British version of pantomime, something almost unknown in the USA. As well as to our fireworks night, 5th November, commemorating a failed attempt by Guy Fawkes to blow up parliament with gunpowder.

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Are we allowed to call an American fellow a yank these days, seems we are not allowed to say things about people from all over the world, bad but it will get worse. Yank is good for me and so is an Aussie. Does it matter about language as long as we all understand each other and that is what matters. Could never understand why I born and breed English had to learn English at school.

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9 hours ago, at9 said:

Oh yes we do! Mr Fawkes.

My reply contains a reference to the British version of pantomime, something almost unknown in the USA. As well as to our fireworks night, 5th November, commemorating a failed attempt by Guy Fawkes to blow up parliament with gunpowder.

Yes, indeed.   I do quite often have to remind those who try to address me or refer to me as a 'guy' that I am neither an American (or a Yank!) nor a bonfire effigy.   

12 minutes ago, dww said:

Are we allowed to call an American fellow a yank these days, seems we are not allowed to say things about people from all over the world, bad but it will get worse. Yank is good for me and so is an Aussie. Does it matter about language as long as we all understand each other and that is what matters. Could never understand why I born and breed English had to learn English at school.

A little more attention at school would have been beneficial.   The point about language is that sloppiness breeds misunderstanding, and that can lead to a lot more than inconvenience.

You are right to question why we are apparently ill-advised to used familiar terms when referring to people from other places.   In my book, that is a friendly informality and very rarely causes offence (except to the unrelated officious bystander - and we have, alas, all too many of them).   I have yet to meet the man from elsewhere in the UK who objects to being called Jock, Taffy or Mick, for example. 

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15 hours ago, at9 said:

Oh yes we do! Mr Fawkes.

My reply contains a reference to the British version of pantomime, something almost unknown in the USA. As well as to our fireworks night, 5th November, commemorating a failed attempt by Guy Fawkes to blow up parliament with gunpowder.

Surprisingly, I was required to study pantomime techniques as a freshman in high school. Not in great depth, I think we did it in Speech class for a week or two, but I remember it well. I was terrible at it! I don't know if it is still a requirement. Probably not.

5 hours ago, dww said:

Does it matter about language as long as we all understand each other and that is what matters. Could never understand why I born and breed English had to learn English at school.

People from Vietnam (where my wife is from) are invariably surprised when I tell them that American high school students are required to take English. I sometimes wonder if it does any good.

5 hours ago, Puffer said:

Yes, indeed.   I do quite often have to remind those who try to address me or refer to me as a 'guy' that I am neither an American (or a Yank!) nor a bonfire effigy.   

A little more attention at school would have been beneficial.   The point about language is that sloppiness breeds misunderstanding, and that can lead to a lot more than inconvenience.

You are right to question why we are apparently ill-advised to used familiar terms when referring to people from other places.   In my book, that is a friendly informality and very rarely causes offence (except to the unrelated officious bystander - and we have, alas, all too many of them).   I have yet to meet the man from elsewhere in the UK who objects to being called Jock, Taffy or Mick, for example. 

I have a couple of thoughts. It happens every once in a while. First, I am not really comfortable calling a British male a "bloke" to their face, simply because I am afraid he will think I'm mocking him. It's not a word I would use normally, living where I do. Perhaps my concern is misplaced.

Second, you are 100% correct about sloppiness leading to misunderstanding, especially at work, and especially when people rely on spell checking programs too much without carefully reading what they've just typed.

Last, I see you are not a fan of the Oxford Comma. Let's not clog up poor Jeff's thread with a discussion about that! Sorry, Jeff!

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1 hour ago, mlroseplant said:

...

I have a couple of thoughts. It happens every once in a while. First, I am not really comfortable calling a British male a "bloke" to their face, simply because I am afraid he will think I'm mocking him. It's not a word I would use normally, living where I do. Perhaps my concern is misplaced.

Second, you are 100% correct about sloppiness leading to misunderstanding, especially at work, and especially when people rely on spell checking programs too much without carefully reading what they've just typed.

Last, I see you are not a fan of the Oxford Comma. Let's not clog up poor Jeff's thread with a discussion about that! Sorry, Jeff!

I don't want to hijack this thread either*.   Suffice it to say:

(a) we don't usually address people as 'bloke', but we can (and should) refer to them thus.   So, I might address a casual acquaintance of similar status (such as a work colleague) as 'mate' but refer to him as 'a bloke I work with' etc.   You would not go wrong if working in the UK or with a British 'bloke' by using these terms; indeed, you would demonstrate friendly integration.

(b) I cringe a little on seeing '... calling a British male a "bloke" to their face ...'.   A male requires 'his' here (and mutatis mutandis if of another gender).   A good example of PC displacing both accuracy and common-sense.   (No offence intended to you, 'mate'; I see this all the time.)

(c)  I don't eschew the Oxford comma when a complex list benefits from one, but don't consider it mandatory.   (I don't much like Oxford shoes however.)

* Maybe there should be a new topic for such academic and pedantic intercourse? :study:

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14 hours ago, dww said:

Are we allowed to call an American fellow a yank these days, 

Down here, a Yankee is what we call someone from north of the Mason-Dixon Line, usually in an unbecoming context lol.  

Regarding the Oxford comma, I was taught to always use it, and it makes sense in my head as a way to offset the potentially confusing practice of using a conjunction on the final item of a serial list.  

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9 hours ago, p1ng74 said:

Down here, a Yankee is what we call someone from north of the Mason-Dixon Line, usually in an unbecoming context lol.  

Regarding the Oxford comma, I was taught to always use it, and it makes sense in my head as a way to offset the potentially confusing practice of using a conjunction on the final item of a serial list.  

But not taught that a split infinitive is a capital offence?   (Another 'rule' that is rightly ignored by most literate people, but not always to the advantage of what they write or speak.)   

I do tend to agree that the Oxford comma has merit and should be used discerningly.   I don't recall ever being told of its existence when I was at school, which now surprises me as our English tuition was of a high standard - and I hope I still do it credit.

Effective communication is at the heart of our society (and indeed this board), so I'm sure that Jeff - an effective communicator himself - will forgive these digressions.

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Jaunt #528, 11/30/2019: While I had off from work on Black Friday, no way was I going to subject myself to the hordes of rabid bargain shoppers that descended on malls like ancient vikings on the rampage, so, other than a morning trip to the gym to work off all the calories I consumed on Thanksgiving, I stayed home and chilled out. This brings us to Saturday as I decided to risk going to King of Prussia on the assumption the crowds would be a good deal more sedate after the madness of Friday, heading out in my black faux leather jacket over a black knit crewneck dress, Hue light gray sweater tights, the Payless “Martinez” ankle boots in black and a matching satchel bag. When it comes to legwear, I’ve kept it simple, never wearing anything with patterns like the sweater like cable knit design like these tights, and I liked how they looked on me (see below), and with chilly temps, they also kept my legs good and warm. As for the dress, it wasn’t anything fancy, just something nice and casual for a weekend outing, then there's the Martinez boots, I certainly enjoy wearing them because of how delightfully loud the 2 1/2 inch block heels were, not to mention comfortable for lengthy periods spent standing and walking.

Now, while the mall wasn’t as crazy as reporters made it and other centers looked on local TV news broadcasts, it was still plenty crowded, perhaps a little more than usual with shoppers (a few looking harried to my untrained eye) burdened down with bags stuffed to overflowing, then there were the scores of kids jumping about like they scarfed down a whole box of sugary cereal, eager to see Santa. In the food court, I decided to buy a salad, after my selection was made and I paid for my purchase, the counterperson said, “Enjoy your lunch, Miss”. I smiled back and thanked her. Enjoying a slow, casual walk through the mall, I stopped at Macy’s where I saw they had jewelry on sale for as much as 50 percent off, seeing a nice silver pendant that was discounted from forty bucks to twenty-four, I decided to buy it, at the counter, the saleswoman who waited on me said, “A good choice. Is it for you, Miss?” I nodded and said it was, she smiled and said she hoped I’d enjoy it. After a stop at Old Navy where I found a sharp looking gray knit dress discounted from fifty bucks to thirty-five, followed by a couple of calendars from a kiosk for home and work, I took a seat to rest for a bit, and to check my email on my phone, after some twenty minutes, I got up and left, but, a moment later, I heard a black woman about my age who had been sitting across from me shout, “Ma’am! Ma’am! You’ve got crumbs on your dress!” I stopped, turned around and saw that had been crumbs in the chair I sat in, looked like they had been from cookies, and I hadn’t noticed. Returning to where the woman sat, she smiled kindly and gently brushed the crumbs off my rear while adding, “Got to be careful where you sit, dear.” I grinned back and promised that I would before I walked away.

That made THREE occasions where I had been called by the female pronoun on this outing. Now, let’s get real here, no one is EVER going to mistake me for a woman, not even on those rare occasions when I wear lipstick, nor do I try for such a thing. I have never attempted to present myself as anything more than a man in women’s clothing, so, when people call me “Miss” or "Ma'am", I can only assume I’ve been accepted for my presentation by the public and, out of deference to my image, they assigned the title they felt was appropriate to the gender to which I’m dressed. Or perhaps I’m overthinking things, maybe it’s nothing more than people not wanting to raise hackles in this age of political correctness, so they take the path of least resistance to avoid trouble and refer to me as female, whatever the reason, I won’t deny I get a charge out of that. But, I digress, my last stop of the day was to Primark where I bought a darling cowl neck sweater dress in light gray, perfect for the cold weather that’s on the way. I tell you, it’s damn hard to describe just how much fun I have wearing skirts, dresses (especially dresses) and heels, the more I do it, the more I love it. Needless to say, more to come....

 

Jaunt #528, outfit-1.jpg

Jaunt #528, outfit-2.jpg

sweater tights.jpeg

 

Edited by JeffB
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19 hours ago, Puffer said:

(b) I cringe a little on seeing '... calling a British male a "bloke" to their face ...'.   A male requires 'his' here (and mutatis mutandis if of another gender).   A good example of PC displacing both accuracy and common-sense.   (No offence intended to you, 'mate'; I see this all the time.)

* Maybe there should be a new topic for such academic and pedantic intercourse? :study:

Upon further review, that made me cringe! I guess I should have read that post through before I hit the reply button. OK, I promise this is the last interruption, @JeffB.

2 hours ago, JeffB said:

I tell you, it’s damn hard to describe just how much fun I have wearing skirts, dresses (especially dresses) and heels, the more I do it, the more I love it. Needless to say, more to come....

 

Nice looking outfit, Jeff! I was wondering, do you ever imagine a day when you will no longer record "jaunts," but go to a less structured, more random format?

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A sharp and impressive look, @JeffB
Cute story with the crumbs too. 

Edited by jeremy1986
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26 minutes ago, mlroseplant said:

Upon further review, that made me cringe! I guess I should have read that post through before I hit the reply button. OK, I promise this is the last interruption, @JeffB.

Nice looking outfit, Jeff! I was wondering, do you ever imagine a day when you will no longer record "jaunts," but go to a less structured, more random format?

Hmm! I’m not sure. I enjoy recording my exploits, mainly to demonstrate to others here, especially those on the fence or unsure about themselves that heeling and freestyling in public CAN be done, and done well.

8 minutes ago, jeremy1986 said:

A sharp and impressive look, @JeffB
Cute story with the crumbs too. 

Thanks. It’s those unplanned encounters with people while freestyling that I enjoy most.

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7 hours ago, JeffB said:

That made THREE occasions where I had been called by the female pronoun on this outing. Now, let’s get real here, no one is EVER going to mistake me for a woman, not even on those rare occasions when I wear lipstick, nor do I try for such a thing. I have never attempted to present myself as anything more than a man in women’s clothing, so, when people call me “Miss” or "Ma'am", I can only assume I’ve been accepted for my presentation by the public and, out of deference to my image, they assigned the title they felt was appropriate to the gender to which I’m dressed. Or perhaps I’m overthinking things, maybe it’s nothing more than people not wanting to raise hackles in this age of political correctness, so they take the path of least resistance to avoid trouble and refer to me as female, whatever the reason, I won’t deny I get a charge out of that.

Interesting.  Sounds like a phenomenal day for you. 

Was there something about your vibe that was giving off a "Miss vibe" you think?

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8 minutes ago, kneehighs said:

Interesting.  Sounds like a phenomenal day for you. 

Was there something about your vibe that was giving off a "Miss vibe" you think?

I really wish I knew. Perhaps there was. When on outings, I take great pains to stand, walk and sit (legs together or crossed) like a woman, making sure to practice good posture while doing all I can to set aside typical male mannerisms, I even try to talk in a softer tone of voice than what is normal for me. Maybe those cues do lend people to accept me as female. Again, I don’t mind that at all.

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That would probably explain it. :thumbsup:

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Jeff, another reason is you look like you could be a woman on chemo. You look very similar to this black woman colleague/friend who lost all her hair while going through chemo for breast cancer. Five years later it just starting to come in sparsely.

Nevertheless enjoy it.

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9 hours ago, mlroseplant said:

Upon further review, that made me cringe! I guess I should have read that post through before I hit the reply button. OK, I promise this is the last interruption, @JeffB.

...

No more from me either!

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13 hours ago, Cali said:

Jeff, another reason is you look like you could be a woman on chemo. You look very similar to this black woman colleague/friend who lost all her hair while going through chemo for breast cancer. Five years later it just starting to come in sparsely.

Nevertheless enjoy it.

agreed - though wouldn't have said it so outwardly!!  And combined with @kneehighs's point - I think that would solve the "mystery" of the feminine form in language!  

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Nice look JeffB. I like the nice contrast between your black sweater dress and the grey tights but I've never been called miss! When I wear my leggings and tights I'm still a man dressing like a woman. I don't care to be called miss, but if it happens, it happens.

Happy Heeling,

bluejay

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Jaunt #529, 12/7/2019: As much as I enjoy my outings in the spring and summer when I get to wear cute spaghetti strap dresses and sandals, there’s a certain something about being out and about in fall and winter that’s plenty exciting too, even when it’s cold as sin outside, and this was a perfect example. Despite sunshine, temps barely passed 35 with winds that made it feel colder, while I could’ve stayed indoors, chained to my couch watching British soccer (it was Manchester Derby day) and college hoops, I decided to go out, all I had to do was dress warmly, and I did, sporting a black wool peacoat from Old Navy I bought a couple of weeks ago over a black turtleneck, my 15 inch distressed denim miniskirt, 200 denier black tights from Primark, the Payless “Martinez” ankle boots in tan and a black handbag. While it would’ve made more sense to wear, UGH....jeans on such a cold day, that was a nonstarter, mainly because I no longer wore such an offensive garment on my outings, and besides, with everything else I wore, I was perfectly warm and comfortable.

Going into downtown, I had a couple of chores to run, the first to the Post Office to buy stamps, followed by a leisurely stroll to Rittenhouse Square and Barnes & Noble to buy a box of holiday cards to send to family and friends outside town. Even though it was plenty cold, it was plenty crowded with holiday shoppers, but no one took notice of me, par for the course on my little adventures these days, and that was okay with me, I’ve probably said this before, but I enjoy wearing skirts, dresses and heels more than I do men’s clothing, I feel truly alive and happier in women’s clothes, I find that I smile more, my mood is lighter and I just plain have a good time, and why wouldn’t I? Freestyling is fun! After buying my cards, I went down to One Liberty Place for lunch, weaving my way through crowds, while standing in line at Saladworks, a Latino couple in their twenties took notice of me, the girl smiled and said she liked my boots, saying she had a pair just like them, as for the guy, he just said, “Damn, that skirt sure is short, dude!” I grinned and thanked them both before we went out separate ways. After lunch, I took my time walking back to where my car was, at a corner while waiting for the traffic light to change, I caught the eye of another twentysomething guy bundled up like an Eskimo who looked at me with confusion in his eyes and he asked me, “Aren’t you cold in that thing?” By “that thing”, I’m guessing he meant the skirt because it was short, I shook my head and said no, and it was the truth, he chuckled and said I had balls, a compliment to be sure, and I took pride in that.

Back in the car, I headed over the bridge into South Jersey. At the Cherry Hill Mall, that Place was packed to the gills with shoppers, but I went unnoticed, even in that short skirt two guys commented on, and that was cool. At the Apple Store, I bought a $25 gift card for the App Store while ogling at the new iPhone which I’ll admit to having been tempted to upgrade since it came out, but I’ve resisted the urge. So far. Moving onto Moorestown Mall (just as crowded) where my favorite multiplex was, I took in the ensemble whodunit, Knives Out which was pretty darn good, I recommend it greatly, following the movie, I went to Sears where I took care of an outerwear problem. You see, I had only black coats and jackets and figured I needed something in a different color to provide contrast, so I bought a faux leather moto jacket in wine, and it looked darn sharp, I’ll be sure to show it off at my earliest opportunity. In the end, being out in the cold wasn’t at all daunting, it was even exciting in its own way, especially when I wore a miniskirt, something one wouldn’t associate with winter weather. More to come....

Jaunt #529, outfit-1.jpg

Jaunt #529, outfit-2.jpg

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19 hours ago, jeremy1986 said:

Cute booties @JeffB and heck - that mini gives meaning to its name!

Thanks! As for the skirt, well, you could say it’s a matter of perspective. On a woman (or man) say, five or six inches shorter than me, it’s no big deal, on someone six foot two like I am, yeah, it’s a serious mini! Heh!

Edited by JeffB
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Jaunt #530, 12/14/2019: The one thing I love most about wearing women’s clothing, it’s the wide variety of colors available to me, and yet, when it came to outerwear, namely coats and jackets to wear in winter, I was dreadfully staid, sticking with just black. But, I decided to change gears, thanks to a wine colored faux leather moto jacket I bought at Sears a week earlier which, on this outing, I paired with a black turtleneck, a 15 plaid miniskirt from Primark, black tights, the Nordstrom BP “Nolly” ankle boots in black and a black satchel bag. At first, I wasn’t sure I could make that new jacket work when I tried it on in the store, but when I did, I was pleased with how good it looked, so I bought it, and wearing it with my ensemble, I cut a damn sharp figure, as you can see below.

My destination for the day was the King of Prussia Mall so I could show off my outfit. Because it had rained earlier in the morning and conditions were overcast, damp and chilly, it wasn’t exactly the kind of day that called for a fancy outfit like what I wore, but, as was often the case, I longed to dress up, mainly because it felt good, I couldn’t help myself, that’s just how I roll. I arrived at the mall shortly after eleven a.m., and it was already quite crowded with holiday shoppers and kids eager to see Santa, after all this time, it’s become routine to wear skirts and dresses to KOP, heck, I can’t for the life of me remember the last time I wore men’s clothing there, and I find it particularly abhorrent to do so now. It’s also routine to go ignored by the public, regardless of where I tread in my high heels, and, as always, I’m pleased with that since it meant I was accepted for my appearance, even in a huge mall packed to the gills with shoppers, I just blend in with surroundings which is impressive in itself. After lunch at Popeye’s where I had their now famous chicken sandwich (and found it good), I went about the business of shopping like everyone else, first to the comic book shop where a female staffer said she liked my jacket, at Old Navy while I tried on a black blazer and checked my appearance in a mirror, a Latino woman who walked by smiled as said, “That jacket looks nice on you. I hope you buy it”. Well, that was all encouragement I needed to make the purchase.

After buying a book for a friend as a Christmas present, I was headed to Primark to look around when a fortysomething woman walked past with a friend, grinned and said, “You look fabulous!”, I grinned back and thanked her, and here I was thinking I went ignored on my little trips. Heh! More proof that if you take your appearance as a freestyler seriously and do all you can to look your very best, chances are you’ll be rewarded with compliments at best, silent approval by the public at worst, and that’s more than good enough for me. More to come....

Jaunt #530, outfit-1.jpg

Jaunt #530, outfit-2.jpg

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Cute booties, @JeffB, and rest of the outfit too. Good move on the jacket ;-) 

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