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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/10/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Other then pink skate laces and a rainbow Jersey I suspect this is not much different then a photo of any pickup hockey game between friends.
  2. 2 points
    I totally agree. I thought America,i mean at least West coast,some places on the East coast and big cities could be more permissive for men in heels. It seems it's not so different from " old" Europe. The funny thing is you get less ( negative?) reactions in Northern Europe than in the countries in the South. I think machismo is not so present there or people are less inclined to show their feelings Pierre
  3. 2 points
  4. 1 point
    Well, you don't see the pink laces and as far as rainbow jerseys go, the world road cycling champion is awarded a rainbow jersey - and that has nothing to do with sexual orientation (any more than the pink jersey at the Giro d'Italia does) so I would say it looks exactly like any other hockey team.
  5. 1 point
  6. 1 point
    Finally it is here! Spring has sprung and I am loving strutting my heeled sandals! Feels so good feeling the warm spring air blowing across my toes after such a long, cold weather. Well I have been a bit absent on here as I started a new job and was so busy learning all the duties and such. But now I have a little breather and thought that I would bring you up on what I have been up to. And believe me it had a lot to do with shoes. I am going to have to sit myself down and snap some photos of the shoes that I have bought recently. Seems like when ever I turn around I see another pair of heels that I just must have! I think I am up to 30 pairs now. I can now see how women can have many, many pairs of shoes. When ever I now walk by a display of shoes I am looking at them with an eye as to what outfit this shoe would go with or maybe that outfit. I know my style, but there are times that I stretch myself when buying a style not necessarily mine. Below is a new pair of 3" heels that I bought for wearing at work. They are cute and classic in design. And I bought a pair of comfortably flats to wear, too. What do you think? As I am wearing my heels in public more and more I am becoming a lot more relaxed and not worrying so much about reactions to my wearing heels. Like today when I stopped at a convenience store, the lady at the counter commented that I am sparkling today (was wearing 4 1/2" heeled sandals that were black with glittering stones on the straps) and an older guy was standing there and he glances down at my shoes and I, without missing a beat, said, "I've got to glitter sometimes". The guy didn't say a word. But what made me feel good afterward was the fact that I was completely okay, that I did not feel nervous. Even when I walk through the mall or a store when it is busy, I find myself relaxed wearing my heels and proud that I do wear heels. So if any of you are just starting out wearing your heels in public and have the case of the nerves, just keep strutting your heels, there will come a day when BAM you find that your fears and nerves have vanished. Just like they did for me. Just one last thing, if any of you are ever in the South Bend, Indiana area and want to meet to shop or just have a meet and greet, let me know. And as always, keep strutting those heels! Chow!
  7. 1 point
    Great looking heels (at a super price!) and they look fab on your legs!
  8. 1 point
    Your not alone in that feeling. In fact i don't care how i appear in photos because i hate to look at myself. Heard actresses Kim Bassinger could not bare to watch herself in films. In many respects i don't care to collect photos taken of myself on the beach even when others offer to send them. Often i reply with i see myself everyday in the mirror why do i need a photo to remind myself how i look like. Yet i try to feel comfortable in the way i appear often is a battle hating or loving the way i see myself. While others i notice wearing clothing imitating my style, i too get annoyed even critical of how they appear. Laughable because i wear the same type of clothes as them, yet find myself tolerable even proud of my appearance. Yet same time find others dressed similar odd or uncomfortable to observe. Do know i won't judge there style or body composition trying to be tolerant of everyone.
  9. 1 point
    New sandals again great bargain i got for around $11
  10. 1 point
  11. 1 point
    He hasn’t mentioned experiencing any “machismo” element, only inner conflicts about the look he presented based on comparisons he had seen with similarly styled men on Pinterest. That has nothing to do with living in Latin America or anywhere else. They are concerns that would be shared by adventurous dressers anywhere and everywhere. And nobody would want to embarrass their family and friends When it comes to that, there is plenty of machismo to be found right across western societies, including, dare I say it, the United States.
  12. 1 point
    OK, well maybe you are concerned about the impact on your family/wife/kids, and that is a good sign that you are a caring/unselfish guy. Does your wife know about your love of boots and feminine attire? If so, how does she feel about it?
  13. 1 point
    Cinch it dress from my favourite brand lululemon. Came out in March of 2018 Thought to add some pictures. Very comfortable Pima cotton dress. Crinkle with draw string seen in picture to tighten along the hem and entire one side.
  14. 1 point
    I think it is seeing something expected. It jars us. To that extent doesn’t it really matter if it looks good if it unsettles or jars us at the same time. When I first tried on my stiletto boots I looked at myself critically and curiously in the mirror. What I saw was difference. Something unexpected and a little unsettling. I had never seen myself in stilettos before. One does not expect to see a man in stiletto boots and it is in our nature to be unsettled by things that surprise us or make us question or doubt. The look seemed odd - but not bad. I recognised that. My legs are slender and fit and long and actually do suit stiletto heels. If I wear them enough, over time, I am sure I’ll become quite used to seeing them on me and accept them as a matter of course. The surprise factor will diminish and fade.
  15. 1 point
    thanks for all your comments, I see that there are different perspectives to every situation and that is exactly why I want to keep reading whatever you have to say. On further thoughts, most of what I have is fear of what might happen to me or my family, I guess I will never know until I try it. When I see myself in pictures, I feel like I look really good, I feel confident. Unfortunately, when I see other men dressed like this, it feels like there is something wrong with the look. Therefore, my conclusion comes to thinking that there is something wrong with the look I portray. I know that this has to do with stereotypes, but I can't help it. I guess it is all a matter of getting used to something different.
  16. 1 point
    To tell a family secret, I have a cousin my age, who is openly gay, and a great guy - like all my relatives, haha. He dresses as a guy and knows that I wear gals shoes - in public even. I guess that makes me, the straight guy, more of a cross dresser than him!! Go figure, so much for stereotypes. Take care all. sf
  17. 1 point
    Thighmax- I too have been "intriqued" by women's high heel boots, ever since I was a little kid. I have gone through many stages, denial, shame, sneaking around, cowboy boots, but am finally accepting the fact that wanting to wear great women's boots is perfectly "normal", even though society tries to force us to believe it is "wrong" or "strange". I truly believe that most men are intrigued by heels as well, but they suffer similar symptoms that I plagued myself with for too many years. Keep in mind that it takes a great deal of courage to go against societies silly "rules", so overcoming these "blockades" shows a great deal of courage and confidence! The key is liking how you look in boots/women's clothing. And, it sounds like you do like what you see when you look in the mirror. I am admittedly confused when you say you don't like what you see when you look at your pictures though. I'm glad that you sought out some advice from a counselor, this is very important. Just keep in mind that counselors are just human like us, and it sounds like you didn't get much relief from the advice. Perhaps you should find a different counselor, or try a few more sessions with your counselor. Starting off slowly is great advice, just like everyone here has advised. This is a frustratingly slow process, building confidence to wear what you like takes a great deal of time, "baby steps" is the best way to describe it...I'm glad you have posted this thread, please know you are not alone and you have found like many like minded folks here. We can't all be wrong! I hope you will post some pictures here, we are all here to help out, encourage you, even offer some gentle advice.
  18. 1 point
    I would say that my comfort range would be 4 to 5 inch heels, but that does not mean that I won't rock a pair of 3" heels!
  19. 1 point
    Thighmax, I commend you on exploring what makes you feel good in terms of clothing and shoes. I can relate. I have been going through a similar transition. For me I started wearing heels over three years ago and now wear them the majority of time in public. Just recently I have been going through the process of wearing women's clothing. Not wearing dresses yet like nzfreestyler does (and I do wish I was at that point in my journey). But I do sometimes wear, blouses, shirt dresses with skinny jeans, etc. What I did to help me create a look and outfits is hire a stylist who worked with me and went shopping with me when I was out looking for new clothes. There were many time that she would look at me when I picked something out and she would tell me, "It's too young", "Won't fit your body", etc. Plus she helped me with colors (color blind). So now days I do wear women's skinny jeans and such when I am not at work. I hope you will continue to push the boundary of your style and become comfortable in what ever you wear. Don't let society's narrow mind set determine what you should wear. We are all unique. Be colorful, be bold, be YOU. And do it with pride and confidence.
  20. 1 point
    Just relaxing in my jeans and Red Kiss Eyecatcher heels this morning before work.
  21. 1 point
    I just don't think about it. In 'general' nobody nowadays thinks about anything important. Elections, policies etc - nobody in general really knows the details - nobody pays enough attention - or has the attention span to listen or read the words.... a bit brutal perhaps..... So why care - I don't think about it - I just put on a skirt and high heels and head out (or perhaps a dress and heels) but either way I selfishly enjoy what I am doing. Don't over think it - 'again a generalisation'..... nobody else is thinking much these days....
  22. 1 point
    And i'd venture to guess, most didn't dress as some would expect a gay group too. That's what I find hilarious. All the gay men I know, and I know quite a few, don't dress any different than straight men. I find they dress a bit better, but not different.
  23. 1 point
    I was just at an event with 160 gay males, and I was the only one who spent any time wearing heels.
  24. 1 point
    Got these blue boots in time for the summer. Hopefully, it won't be too sweltering to feel like I'm shedding a layer of flesh in them.
  25. 1 point
    Thanks. I appreciate everyone's concern and wise advice. I won't get sacked, as I'm self-employed, and something actually written into the company's mission statement is the word 'fun', so it would be taken in good part by everyone if (that word again!) I get the support and contribution of the ladies in question. I always wear heels to company events anyway, so that wouldn't be new. Perhaps stilettos would be new... I'll just wait and see what happens. I'll wear my block heel boots and possibly put a pair of stilettos in the car.


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