Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Debbie(HK)

Improbability of wearing 7" all day

Recommended Posts

How do you measure heel height anyway

Shane

I have always measured at the rear of the shoe. I would put the heel tip on a flat surface and measure up along the rear of the heel up to where it meets the sole.

As far as I know, shoe stores and manufacturers measure it the same way as I do. But maybe it's different outside the USA.

PJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think PJ's right, at least that's how I always understood measuring heel height.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

while it's true that heel height is measured form floor to the meeting pint of heel and sole, it doesn't really give a good indication of the angle. A person wearing a size 5 shoe with a 7" heel is going to have a far greater angle (more on the toes) than a person wearing size 8 with a 7" heel. someone has to come up with a fairly good sum to work out just what that angle is or even have it regarded as a severity level. Anyone got a formula worked out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

someone has to come up with a fairly good sum to work out just what that angle is or even have it regarded as a severity level. Anyone got a formula worked out?

As I said B4 elsewhere, it depends on whether a "heel shelf" of a somewhat shallower angle is present or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Until now I've avoided participation in any of the discussions about the probability or improbability of wearing 7" heels all day. It all just seemed a bit silly. What's the difference in that and a little woman with size 4 feet standing in 4" heels all day. The fundamentals of basic math dictate when limits are approached, the higher the heel relative to shoe size the bigger the foot. Toss in a little bit of progressive geometry and the same thing is reinforced. When I saw mention of a 7" heel (arch) on a size 5 it was apparent that fantasy and absense of all reality had set in. A 7" heel is impossible on a size 5. A full 6" heel on a size 5 is a stretch of the imagination. When extremes are reached the angle of the "heel plate" of the shoe becomes progressively steeper, no secret there. The reality is all feet are not created equal. The limit of the forward rotational arc of the ankle, the pitch of the foot, and the angle of the heel bone, like it or not, establishes what is and isn't achievable. All you have to do is review the multitudes of pictures of extreme heels and it's obvious the contour of the foot does not match or fit the contour of the extreme heel shoe in most cases. Occasionally, very rarely, a person will have ankles capable of an enhanced arc with a high pitched heel bone, much more compatable with extreme heels. Even then there are limits. The geometric absolutes require the heel height to be less than the linear length from the base of the shank to the back of the heel plate, which must be less than the surface length from the base of the shank to the back of the heel plate. I don't know that a progressive formula is needed. A simple percentage of heel height to length of foot (ball to end of heel) might be a lot easier. In the end, so what! Why worry about it. Susan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It my be the heel height that gets all the attention, but I think it's the angle between the ball of the foot and heel. Think about it...I am just going to pick some numbers out of the air, but lets say the angle from the ball of the foot to the heel is at a 45 degree angle. Now where the size of the foot comes in, is the length of the foot. The larger the foot, the longer the foot is. So if you hold the same angle on a size 12 compared to a size 5, the heel on a size 12 is going to be taller. You are holding the same angle, it's just accommodating the length of a larger "longer" foot. If you hold the same 45 degree angle on a size 5 the heel is going to be shorter. Usually there is a 1" to 1.25" height difference from a size 5 to a size 12. So yes, some one wearing a size 5 shoe is not going to be able to wear a true 7" heel. :drinking: In this case I think they would be wearing ballet heels instead. :lol: or platforms.... :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So yes, some one wearing a size 5 shoe is not going to be able to wear a true 7" heel. :drinking: In this case I think they would be wearing ballet heels instead. :lol: or platforms.... :)

To sum this up I would say that it is not absolute heel height that matters but rather relative height. Sho sizes differ greatly, bu the perfect angle or arch stays the same :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday I saw a pair of shoes with a 5 inch heel (maybe slightly more) and a 0.5 inch platform; they looked absolutely impossible to walk in with the foot sole being almost vertical. They were UK size 2. I know someone who has the same shoes in UK size 3, and after 20 years of heel wearing she can actually run in them quite well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using High Heel Place, you agree to our Terms of Use.