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meganiwish

Twelve Days

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Not so. The song lists the gifts recieved so far. In other words the song is saying (in not so many words) On the second day of Christmas my true love sent to me 2 turtle doves as well as the partridge in a pear tree which he sent yesterday. But it wouldn't scan...

 

Instead the verse goes: On the second day of Christmas my true love sent to me 2 turtle doves and the partridge in a pear tree.

I had a five bird roast at Christmas. Turkey, duck, pheasant, chicken and goose.

Mais non, Good Dr.  The words are ... AND A partridge etc.  It is undoubtedly cumulative.

 

Shafted, I think it's happy coincidence, or serendipity, the happiest word in the world.  As a maths exercise it's a good thing to keep a class quiet for a morning in the last week of term.

 

Most counting songs count backwards.  Can anyone think of one that counts forwards?

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# On the thirteenth day of Christmas

# My true love sent to me

The credit card bill.

 

That would provide a resolution to the debate.

 

 

Most counting songs count backwards.  Can anyone think of one that counts forwards?

 

I couldn't think of one, but a quick search found this one (among others) which counts monkeys from one to ten:

http://www.songsforteaching.com/math/additionsubtraction/10sillymonkeys.htm

 

Oh, I've just thought that "#One o'clock, two o'clock, three o'clock, rock" counts forwards.

Ah, and "#Once, twice, three times a lady"... (what a romantic I am to consider that a counting song!).

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# On the thirteenth day of Christmas

# My true love sent to me

The credit card bill.

 

That would provide a resolution to the debate.

 

 

 

I couldn't think of one, but a quick search found this one (among others) which counts monkeys from one to ten:

http://www.songsforteaching.com/math/additionsubtraction/10sillymonkeys.htm

 

Oh, I've just thought that "#One o'clock, two o'clock, three o'clock, rock" counts forwards.

Ah, and "#Once, twice, three times a lady"... (what a romantic I am to consider that a counting song!).

 

Sorry, Shafted, that one counts down, as does the English 'Ten green bottles.'

 

Well done, Sleekheels, but not really traditional songs, even Bill Bailley.  By the way, £15 is known as a Commodore. £5 is known as 'a lady'.  From  'fiver', which rhymes with 'Lady Godiva'.  https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=lady+godiva&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&gws_rd=cr&ei=eI60VJK8KcruUNz6gsAG  Anyway, £15 is a commodore because it's 'three times a lady.'

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Partridge IN A pear tree. Does this mean you would get the pear tree (trees) as well. How would they get them through the door?

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Partridge IN A pear tree. Does this mean you would get the pear tree (trees) as well. How would they get them through the door?

 

Yes, the pear trees are are all-inclusive.   It is usual to wait for the assistance of the Lords-a-leaping before attempting to bring any trees indoors - although better to retain them in the garden as a roosting place.

 

There is of course another (English) version of this song, although I would be banned if I reproduced it in full.   Suffice it to say that it includes references to 'seven sex-starved spinsters, six convicted vicars, five choir boys' etc, and the first day's gift is 'My Lord Montagu of Beaulieu' - a reference to the late peer (pronounced 'Bewlee') who allegedly had homosexual liaisons when that was still illegal in the 1950s. 

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Oh, I've just thought that "#One o'clock, two o'clock, three o'clock, rock" counts forwards.

 

Well done, Sleekheels, but not really traditional songs, even Bill Bailley.

 

I was led astray by the fact that every time that song's played at a wedding I suddenly feel like I'm on the film set of "Cocoon".

("a 1985 science-fiction/fantasy film directed by Ron Howard about a group of elderly people rejuvenated by aliens" - Wikipedia)

 

 

By the way, £15 is known as a Commodore. £5 is known as 'a lady'.  From  'fiver', which rhymes with 'Lady Godiva'.  https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=lady+godiva&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&gws_rd=cr&ei=eI60VJK8KcruUNz6gsAG  Anyway, £15 is a commodore because it's 'three times a lady.'

 

Some Londoner I am, I could only remember "pony" (£25) and "monkey" (£500). I couldn't resist a search

http://www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk/blog/post/how-to-remember-cockney-money-slang.aspx

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I know it from the horses.  What a delightful post.  There was the funniest thing on The Big Breakfast, a song: Do you know the way to Basildon?/ Den's got a lot of friends in Basildon,/ Essex is a great big freeway/ Put a monkey down and buy a Ford


And this is pretty poor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYDgjY7_jW8


Oops, wrong thread.

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I guess I also knew "score" (£20) but I can't imagine that Abraham Lincoln gave the Gettysburg Address in cockney:

"Four score and seven donkey's ears ago..."

(not quite "horses" Megan, but close enough!)

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