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stilletoboot

Is Wearing Stilleto Boots A Challenge

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I love wearing stilleto boots but have not worn a pair more than 2 or 3 hours in the house,but I watch women everyday wearing stilleto boots running across streets at work 8 to 9 hours a day, and to me it looks to be easy and fun,so I want to no is that hard to do,is it a challenge, and what part of the foot takes the most of the punishment?

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Stiletto boots are my everyday footwear of choice. In fact, of all the stiletto footwear out there, stiletto boots have the capability of being the most supportive and comfy for long term wear. A really good pair of stiletto boots (all leather) cause little if any foot discomfort to me. Then again I've been wearing stilettos for 8 years now. I don't spend much time flat except when in barefoot or stocking feet. If things aren't fitting quite right you are most likely to feel discomfort in the ball of your foot. It really depends on the person on if it easy or not. If you walk properly to begin with, you'll have no problems. If you have a toe in or excessive toe out, they could be a problem. Good posture is also of great importance for ease of wear. Your stride in stilettos should feel just as natural as in flats. Be warned though if you spend as much time in stilettos as I do, you are going to feel awkward in flats.

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I found that shortening my stride a bit, and making sure your posture is good so that your feet are hitting the ground level, will make it easier. Outside of an all out sprint, I'm confident in my heels.

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I find some boots can be more tiring over the course of the day simply because the ankle doesn't have as much freedom of movement compared with court-shoe heels. But it's not so bad once you're used to it, and it's worth it for a beautifully shaped boot.

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My first pair of open heeled heels gave me the same problem. I was so conscious of my heels slipping a bit, it threw off my confidence for a bit.

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Brand, style, and proper fit surely do make a big difference...My Jessica Simpson 5" stiletto boots are easier to walk in than my 5" cowboy boots!

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Brand, style, and proper fit surely do make a big difference...My Jessica Simpson 5" stiletto boots are easier to walk in than my 5" cowboy boots!

There's a big difference in mass there too. Higher mass means more work is required to do the same job. That is one thing I love about the stiletto. And that is how much mass is removed by design. It really adds spring to your step.

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I think its more of a challenge with platform stilettos. I think single sole boots are easier to walk in. And stilettos are more comfortable than chunkys, and also look nicer.

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I think its more of a challenge with platform stilettos. I think single sole boots are easier to walk in. And stilettos are more comfortable than chunkys, and also look nicer.

Yep, I do find single sole easier to walk in from my limited experience in low (1/2 inch) platforms. And yes, I do find stilettos vastly more comfy to walk in than chunky heels. You have the added bonus of actually being able to feel the surface under you, and that feedback allows one to adjust accordingly.

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As an avid stiletto court shoe fanatic with only a few pair of stiletto boots in my wardrobe, it seems that whatever your selection of heels there may be a period of familiarization that needs to take place in order to find your optimal confidence in wearing the height of your choosing. This is on the pretence of assuming these heels fit properly and you understand your specific feet and ankle features and limitations. I would wear 6" stilettos all the time, but my limitation to presenting a gracefully stride is around 4.5" to 5" relative height depending on the particular footwear chosen. Then again, there have even been some of equal or lesser heights that may look great on display, but I won't wear because of their low cut designing of the vamp and sides, the narrowed pointing of the toe box that distort the look and way the heels fit, or the rounded toe box that look like they used a compass to create the form. Don't get me wrong here, I like pointed and rounded toes, for I find them very attractive, even apropriately great options at times, when properly designed to enhance the contour of their respectively fitted footing. Now as for the challenge part of your quiry. Having worn spikes/stilettoes for a number of years, I find the only real challenge is from one's own perspective. Now, I have seen videos of first time wearers of heels appearing to have difficulty or at least faking some inability. Which may be the case for many who wear heels higher than their expectations. Some how I got through this stage almost immediately upon donning my first heels and I haven't had much of any problem since, as long as I stayed with in my range for confident walking. You have to become aware of the surfaces you might encounter and the type of heel tips being used. Most heel tips are hard plastic, which are great for durability and terrible for sustaining any placement hold. Metal tips have the same gripping properties for walking. Hard rubber heel tips are the best for holding their position in the walking actiivty, but tend to need replacement sooner. Getting on a hard, glass-like smooth floor that many stores and malls have may cause the stiletto to slip some upon contact, if you don't land your step by putting down the toes micro-instantly first. Other surfaces, such as most sidewalks, carpeted, and fabric matted tend to be the most compatible for high heeling. Wood surfaces usually don't fare well being walk on by heels, especially spikes and stilettoes for the heels tend to leave depression marks. As for other uneven surfaces, one must be more careful and make use of their more ballerina-like stride as they walk and learn how to negotiate with any somewhat slender high heels. Should this challenge be the result of wanting to be more exhibiting while wearing your stilettoes, then a solution can be found as your mind gets control over what really matters to you. Many of us heelers live in the freest society the world has ever known, yet we imprison our activities because of the social attitudes displayed and perceived concerning men and women in heels. Even now, more people are aware of men desiring to wear heels, where a few years ago, the very thought would mean the bearer of such activities would be ostracised from social gatherings and considered a degenerate. Women weren't excluded from dealing with this situation, either. The social climate still views men in heels as a bit queerish, but tends to give a "don't care, not me" reaction, which is a long way from complete separation and no contact. As men wear heels more in public places, the social conscience will realize the significance of people being able to make their own personal decisions and applying their equality status as human beings, which is as it should be in an ideal free-society that I hope is the goal everyone is striving to make happen.

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