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thehighheelsgirl

Stilettos to thicker/ chunkier heel?

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A girl I work with was talking to me today about making her favorite stilettos not stilettos anymore. Can you do this? She wants the same heel height, just in a chunkier heel. Where do you go to find someone who can do this?

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I don't think that is possible to be able to do a proper job of it. Putting a block heel on a stiletto shoe very well could mess up the geometry of the shoe, which could make it quite difficult to walk properly in. I also don't think that a stiletto shoe could handle stresses from a larger chunky heel. You see a stilletto heel attaches to the insole, the shank and upper of the shoe. The sole is, in the classic case is breasted, which means the the sole continues down the leading edge of the heel to the toplift. A typical chunky heel shoe has a full sole and the heel is attached directly to the sole. Anyway the two styles of heel require different construction methods for the shoe. I don't think a stiletto shoe could safely be converted to a chunky heel without major rebuilding of the shoe.

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I don't think it would be too difficult at all, as long as the chunky heel is the same height, and the shape matches up to the shoe properly. A wood heel could be used and shaped to match, then covered with vinyl or leather to match the shoe. It could even be painted to match (if done properly, of course). Any competent shoe repair shop should be able to do it, and would have access to many differnt shape and sizes of replacement heels.

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It depends on the original construction, first... the biggest problem nowadays is how the insole/shank/heel seat is constructed...too involved to say it here....(I am always fixing bad/loose heels, and I see why they break, or come loose) the reconstructing isn't any different, as putting on a new heel block is virtually the same as fixing a loose heel.

that whole area has to be fixed, tightened, etc before renailing the heel...the same goes for putting on a new heel block.

I had lowered her heels previously over an inch, to see if that would help...she later decided to have me replace them.

see picture,

http://hartlandshoes.us/recover2.jpg

It mostly depends on if the shop wants to do the job.

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I don't think it would be too difficult at all, as long as the chunky heel is the same height, and the shape matches up to the shoe properly. A wood heel could be used and shaped to match, then covered with vinyl or leather to match the shoe. It could even be painted to match (if done properly, of course). Any competent shoe repair shop should be able to do it, and would have access to many differnt shape and sizes of replacement heels.

Ditto. I've replaced heels on three pairs of shoes/boots myself and it's not a difficult thing to do if you take a shoe to the shop to choose a matching heel. It's better to take both; one with the original heel, other with the heel removed.

Shafted - you may be right... but not in every case. I've swapped 3" stilletto heels on a pair of Clarks boots for block/cowboy ones, and happily wore the pair :). I don't know how it's done on higher heels or on other brands of footwear, though.

BTW. as for making new heels out of wood, it's a nice idea. I'll certainly try that :).

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Going to a thicker, chunky heel makes the shoe LESS pretty, graceful, feminine. Just my opinion. I can't for the life of me understand why a woman will compromise her feminine LOOK by wearing those awful clunkers in the name of current style. Always stick with a classic. It will out last any fad. Original spike heels had been "in" for 53 years except for the ugly 1970s.

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