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p1ng74

Boot "season"?

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That’s a nice compliment and nice of her to give it. 

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13 hours ago, p1ng74 said:

I received a third comment this evening right after posting this.  When the lady tending bar in the restaurant gave me the bill, she said “You probably walk better in those heel than I can.  You’re rocking them!”  

Fun day today - and I get to contemplate opportunities to wear these nice pants 

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Accepting all compliments no matter what their motives are. Way to go P1ng74!

Being renowned pessimist always trying to figure out someone’s angle. Asking myself  questions and  others motives, why the comments. Taking them with grain of salt, just as if negative opinions were being tossed around. 

In my experience you can notice a noticable difference with the vibe, around you. People looking at you differently than ever before. Not because the style has changed  or is different in small way but how well you wearing it, such as complimentary colours, texture, fabric, design etc...  

People notice me but some outfits look more special and i can feel, observe, others paying much closer attention as ever before. Without getting a verbal comment about the outfit I can judge others are intrigued, envious. You know when your rocking it better than others surrounding you else, when you see them stare longer than normal. Often i can be scanned by someone and they look away quickly keeping a safe distance essentially ignoring me. It's telling clue they are not liking my outfit. When the opposite is true they scan me over and begin to take small glances time to time never seemingly taking their eyes away,  i then know i'm doing something right. 

Just yesterday i rocked a nice new gym outfit. From most females smiles, gleeful reactions, upon me i knew the new outfit was one many enjoyed observing which doesn't come along very often. Also me in it  had little to do with it, but a small part to model the outfit for there benefit.

Even some beloved members who seen me many times before without any animosity  or incident wearing my attire began to instantly get upset intially observing me.. Part of their anger stems from being aware  i beat them to the punch purchasing a new gym outfit. Also there binary beliefs  being much better suited for their known favourite colours then little old me. Overheard discussion amongst young asian posh woman unaware i was listening as the commenting about my passion for wearing  nice female gym outfits. Them agreeing i rock it better then many woman in the gym,  bringing some ire reactions from self conscious ladies. Telling their group of girlfriends inspiring, motivating themselves to work harder or visiting the gym more often. This was all said with slight bemusement amongst the group of asian gym rat females. Which is far cry to acceptance or comments made directly to me on there true feelings wearing said outfits. Shows me there is more in grained discriminatory  prejudgedice or non acceptance men wearing feminine clothing belief system for most woman out there.

Think that's the best I can hope for, then getting someone’s notable comments about my attire.  Yet didn't deter me from feeling upbeat and happy wearing my new attire. From my many years of experience wearing said outfits feels that when you put your head down through the pushing wind of negativity it will slowly change the tide with others realizing they were wrong  feeling better and positive with regards to my outfits.

Edited by MackyHeels

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Yes I enthusiastically thanked each person because they offered positive encouragement.  

I have enjoyed dressing up since I was a teenager, and am open to experimentation and improvement.  In the office and business meetings I am almost always the only guy wearing a blazer, etc.  My goal with heels is not to suddenly transform my overall look, but to expand its boundaries.  Based on the reaction from the street, I think it is working, because the heels have not garnered any more attention than wearing a new blazer or tie.

Most people take cues on dressing appropriately based solely on what everyone else is wearing.  I like the idea of putting together my own style that is still befitting and appropriate.  

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I take a certain pleasure in having an offbeat dress code for my office here at home. No jacket or tie at any time, but nearly always skinny jeans and boots.

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2 hours ago, MackyHeels said:

Think that's the best I can hope for, then getting someone’s notable comments about my attire.  Yet didn't deter me from feeling upbeat and happy wearing my new attire. From my many years of experience wearing said outfits feels that when you put your head down through the pushing wind of negativity it will slowly change the tide with others realizing they were wrong  feeling better and positive with regards to my outfits.

The gym is not a place where I would expect to get much positive encouragement about attire.  I imagine if people are comparing anything would be mostly their bodies.  I think interactions in the gym may not be representative of broader attitudes towards fashion, or apply to heels, seeing as they are not worn there.  

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1 hour ago, p1ng74 said:

The gym is not a place where I would expect to get much positive encouragement about attire.  I imagine if people are comparing anything would be mostly their bodies.  I think interactions in the gym may not be representative of broader attitudes towards fashion, or apply to heels, seeing as they are not worn there.  

On contrary many want to encourage others to look better, clothing is icing on the cake.

Bodies are scrutinized but many know they aren’t perfect. 

Heels are worn for many fitness pageant woman practicing there stage posing routines. 

Yet many woman obsess working there glutes in order to look firmer when wearing heels. 

At the same time many just use the gym for what it is. Leaving in same black athletic wear they were exercising in. Making it staple many woman wear as appropriate casual style attire. Yet try to ignore others in comparison. Only when someone compliments them they tend to realize what they wear is just important then anything else.  

Edited by MackyHeels

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Even the dressier slacks fall nicely over the boots:

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I’m not into skinny jeans, so if I ever find myself in a casual office, I’ll be going this route:

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4” heels all day today as usual, but I dressed down a little before heading down to the bar:

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p1ng74,

You certainly present a nice and natural look. I have to wonder though if it gets old being in a hotel all the time? I once lived in a hotel for nine weeks when my family moved from Arizona to Chicago in 1992. That was when I was working at O"Hare Airport. We tired of the hotel and the urban scene and were able to move into our home just two days before Christmas...in Wisconsin.  We've been here ever since. I had just one home-cooked meal in that nine week stretch at my cousn's house. I would imagine your outfits are a form of entertainment? I do wish you all the best in 2019. HinH

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I have spent weeks living in hotels and know just what you mean. There is nothing like coming home to a plain, home-cooked meal. One really learns to appreciate the simple pleasures of home life.

Edited by Shyheels

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Nine weeks - ugh.  Hotels are fun for vacations - not so much as living quarters!

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15 hours ago, HappyinHeels said:

p1ng74,

You certainly present a nice and natural look. I have to wonder though if it gets old being in a hotel all the time? I once lived in a hotel for nine weeks when my family moved from Arizona to Chicago in 1992. That was when I was working at O"Hare Airport. We tired of the hotel and the urban scene and were able to move into our home just two days before Christmas...in Wisconsin.  We've been here ever since. I had just one home-cooked meal in that nine week stretch at my cousn's house. I would imagine your outfits are a form of entertainment? I do wish you all the best in 2019. HinH

I have been traveling full time since 2010 and I still enjoy the pampering at a hotel.  I agree with @Shyheels traveling and being away from home helps me appreciate what I have at home more.  Though hotels also do a good job of delivering pleasant stays, so it works the other direction as well.  When I am at home I look forward to my next trip and hotel stay, and during the trip I look forward to going home.  It’s like any other cycle in life, really, and not one that most people get to experience so I feel fortunate.  

The same goes with meals.  My wife’s cooking has an appealing style that cannot be purchased at restaurants.  This drives up the level of standard by which I pursue meal experiences while I am traveling.  When I eat out I try to learn new taste sensations that I bring into meals that I make at home, so it’s like the cycle of growth again.  

I take all the indoor pictures of outfits from the hotel mostly because the lighting is much better, and yes it is something fun to add to the day especially when work at the office is boring.  

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I have the same mixed feelings - there is a lovely moment when you settle into your airplane seat on the outbound journey, knowing that you are on your own, uncontactable for the next few hours, and outward bound with everything ahead of you. Ditto some evenings in the hotel. But mealtimes can feel isolating, when the waiter pointedly removes the other set of cutlery from the table, and you dine alone.   

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The dining alone reference made me remember something which I believe has enriched my soul over the years. Before I was married I was travelling in my own car, brought by ferry from Spain to Morocco, and met a man along the way as I arrived in Ifrane. Ifrane sits high up in the Atlas Mountains and has a four-season climate. Its winters are cold and summers have continental type of heat. The vegetation and scenery look more like Colorado or the area around Flagstaff than a nation in Africa.

I was taking photos and the man offered to take a photo of me. Since my Arabic was limited he spoke French so that's how we communicated. Noticing the accent he asked where I learned French and I told him the story of my father and the family farm in Quebec. I got invited to his home for dinner and was greeted like royalty there. Two hours later I was filled both with food and happiness after dining with complete strangers. I would have dined alone that night but the patron saint of travellers had other plans for me. Ifrane holds a special place for me because of that day. Later this year my wife and I plan to return to our old neighbourhood in Spain. The trip includes a voyage to Morocco. Guess where I'll be going?

I have dined with several strangers over the years most recently in Memphis when my wife and I spent the long New Year's weekend (2017 into 2018) there as a diversion. The guy at the rental car place suggested Central Barbecue downtown as an option which we did. Whilst waiting outside to be seated a couple next to us started to chat with us. They were wearing the colours of the Iowa State Cyclones and were in town to see the Liberty Bowl. She was from Chicago and he was from Arkansas and they both lived near Little Rock. An hour later we were stuffed and has taken photos of each other and exchanged numbers. Quite a nice meal! There is something unifying, almost prehistoric, about humans sharing a meal together. Perhaps, just perhaps, those of you are on the road for such a long time might share a meal with a stranger instead of dining alone. It instantly adds an extra perspective to any trip which I believe uniquely helps us understand the human condition. I can still smell the couscous from a dinner 35 years ago this June.  HappyinHeels

Edited by HappyinHeels
misspelling

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That's a lovely story.

I have had the good fortune many times in the course of my career to enjoy that sort of spontaneous hospitality and on every occasion it has been special, and left me with fond memories. Cumulatively, those experiences - and others I have experienced on the road - have left me with an impression that the vast - nay, overwhelming - majority of people are essential good. 

Edited by Shyheels

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Yes, indeed the vast majority of people are good. Those who are not often meet untimely ends sooner or later. I really believe when people venture out away from organised tours they are essentially saying to the world, "I want to learn and enjoy and experience what you have to offer." It is the mobile university. HinH

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7 hours ago, Shyheels said:

I have the same mixed feelings - there is a lovely moment when you settle into your airplane seat on the outbound journey, knowing that you are on your own, uncontactable for the next few hours, and outward bound with everything ahead of you. Ditto some evenings in the hotel. But mealtimes can feel isolating, when the waiter pointedly removes the other set of cutlery from the table, and you dine alone.   

When I was growing up people would tell me how depressing it is to dine alone, and I have colleagues today who still regularly order room service instead of eating out because of this.  To me that is even more tragic, as that is the ultimate isolation and the food is often not good.   

I remember taking my very first business trip and first meal “alone” when I was fresh out of college and finding nothing depressing about it at all.  There are people still all around you to interact with, as people have pointed out here, and just because you have never met before doesn’t mean they have to remain a “stranger”.  

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It depends on the circumstances, the restaurant, the hotel, the mood. I’ve had solitary meals I enjoyed very much, and had ones where the food was great and I thought: what’s the point.

One aspect of solitary travel I do like very much is the business lounge at an airport. I enjoy me time there, people watching and enjoying the sense of agreeable expectancy that comes over me.

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When traveling alone a beer or two in lounge is very relaxing. As for dinner, if at the hotel I'll usually eat at the bar, good interaction is always available there and you don't get the alone feeling.

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Agree, I sit at the bar or lounge area at restaurants for dinner too because it is usually the same menu, it encourages more interactions, and it is probably more efficient for the restaurant that I not occupy an entire table for one.  Also, bar seating shows off those heels, rather than hiding them under a tablecloth!

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Because of the nature of my work, given that dawn and evenings are when you get really nice light, mealtimes tend to be a bit screwy. In some of the hotels they have a business lounge , often with quite decent snacks and I will often head there and make a dinner of snacks. 

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When I did travel for work I also would quite often eat at the bar or at least in the lounge.  I have bad hearing, so I don't often interact with strangers, as I have a very difficult time trying to hear, especially in a crowded place.  That makes conversation difficult.  And I tend to be a rather shy person as well.  

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