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maninboots

Heels for an interview

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Hi guys, here's a little topic i found in the girls section and as i like to obey the rules i couldn't comment, has or would anyone wear heels for a job interview, i did as a teenager many years ago in the early 80's for a part time job strangely enough in a shoe shop in Birmingham, i wore a pair of 4" stiletto knee boots with a mans suit and trousers, the interviewer did pick up on my wearing heels and asked plenty of questions about why i was wearing them and if i would be planning to wear them to work if i got the job, i told her that i didn't see any reason why not but needless to say i didn't get the job, would be interested to know if anyone else has had any experience of this and if things would be different in this day and age particularly in the U.K. 

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I have never done anything like that but I can’t imagine the result would be any different today than it was for you thirty-odd years ago. 

Edited by Shyheels
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If I'm truthful i wasn't really bothered about the job anyway, it was only a part time school leavers job for a bit of pocket money to see me through to starting my apprenticeship 6 weeks or so later, i only really did it to gauge the reaction and to see if a male could obtain employment whilst wearing heels which is why I chose to apply to a shoe shop, thought that would be my best chance, if my whole future depended upon it I wouldn't have worn them, would love to try it again now to see if times have changed but as you say probably not 

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From what I understand wearing the wrong colour tie can ruin one’s chances at interviews these days...

Edited by Shyheels
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I’ve seen a male sales assistant at a Saks wearing heels to work in the women’s shoe section. He spotted me wearing heels and seems to want me to try on anything they had in my size. :)

 

I work for the family business and while my parents found out I liked heels while I was growing up I’ve not pushed to make it a public thing with them.

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As you have said, for any important job interview (a job that you really care about getting), I definitely wouldn't do it.  The first impression is everything for interviews, and while you may get lucky and find an open minded interviewer or two, once you leave, any simple excuse can be made to put your resume into the discard pile.  If you rocked the interview, would you want to be passed over simply for your choice in shoes?  Otherwise, if you just want to have fun, and its for a job that doesn't matter much to you, sure, why not?

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I have worn block heels to interviews before. Nothing was said. I wore heels and got my curren job. Unfortunately the dress code is casual, so more trainers than shoes or boots.

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I'm from the US, so surely don't want to make generalizations about the UK...I am sad to admit that I feel wearing heels would hurt your chances for most jobs.  But, on the other hand, for the less than 1% of employers who are looking for a creative/unique/confident applicant, heels might be just the thing to separate you from the usual crowd!

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I feel the first question should be :What type of job are you seeking ? Then the footwear should be dress or casual on the conservative side , for most average employment . Then we have Americans spouting off about gender equality , this is simply not true . 

 For instance there is an opening at Cheat You Right Bank . Both a man and woman have an interview for a teller job . The man would be wise to show up business casual ( Sperry Boat shoe ) . Then the woman shows up in a pair of trousers and 2 inch pumps . The reality is if the guy shows up in the 2 inch pumps he will be struck from the prospective employment list at first sight . Simply because he is wearing heels and could "rock the boat" .  Hope everyone has a great day .

 

 

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On 17/10/2017 at 2:32 PM, Shyheels said:

From what I understand wearing the wrong colour tie can ruin one’s chances at interviews these days...

I realise you speak from experience - and from the perspective of someone with a vast collection of ties in all colours!   :confused:

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No ties...and no interviews! The joys of being self employed. 

But even a garlic and onions peasant like myself hears of such things as neckties, interviews and mulish interviewing panels.

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If a man can "move the merch" as they say in the retail world then he has achieved the goal of any retail establishment. Choice of footwear should not make any difference. I realize plenty of places still play the traditional gender role game. The more comfortable employees feel the more likely they are achieve any reasonable sales goal set before them. HappyinHeels

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I have worn booties with 3" block heels in black leather.  They are very thick and look like dressy cowboy boots under the slacks.  It helps being in Texas, I once wore them to an interview in Wisconsin and one of the guys kept saying yee haw (I kid you not).  I don't own any dress shoes so those are about as close as I can get.  I did get turned down for the job in Wisconsin but it might have been something else I said or didn't rather than the shoes.  The worst shoes you can wear to an interview in my opinion are sneakers (well maybe flip flops). 

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1 hour ago, blueparrot said:

I have worn booties with 3" block heels in black leather.  They are very thick and look like dressy cowboy boots under the slacks.  It helps being in Texas, I once wore them to an interview in Wisconsin and one of the guys kept saying yee haw (I kid you not).  I don't own any dress shoes so those are about as close as I can get.  I did get turned down for the job in Wisconsin but it might have been something else I said or didn't rather than the shoes.  The worst shoes you can wear to an interview in my opinion are sneakers (well maybe flip flops). 

Sounds like the Wisconsin job was a good one to miss. I doubt very much it was the boots, but rather a silly stereotyping of Texans by the jackass on the interview panel. To be sure, it might also have been some answer you gave to a question, but I’d guess the interviewer’s peasant view of the world would have coloured things to an extent that you were never in with a shot anyway.

Edited by Shyheels

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On 21/10/2017 at 5:55 AM, HappyinHeels said:

If a man can "move the merch" as they say in the retail world then he has achieved the goal of any retail establishment. Choice of footwear should not make any difference. I realize plenty of places still play the traditional gender role game. The more comfortable employees feel the more likely they are achieve any reasonable sales goal set before them. HappyinHeels

True, but if you aren’t seen as a good fit, with the right look, you will never be given the opportunity to “move the merch”

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I must second Shyheels here. I would never have shown my true color if I wasn't sure I was rock solid enough to end up venturing in my field on my own.

When it comes to dealing with fellow humans, I believe that one should steer clear of high principles and the "how it should be in a civilized world". One should in my opinion keep to the facts. The fact is that what gets you in a door is rarely talent alone. The interviewer won't even be aware of the deep motivations that makes them choose you or another.

I also do not do it with clients either. They don't pay me to see me be myself. They pay me because they believe I will meet their expectations - all or pretty much all of them.

 

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