meganiwish

Suits without ties

100 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, meganiwish said:

You doubt that it's moot then begin the next sentence with 'if'.

Getting a little desperate there, me thinks. A big reach. You know perfectly well that is a legitimate sentence construction in this context.

The image of the Kardashians as poor waifs, vulnerable and cold and exposed in the glare of the footlights is never going to fly. Want to back up from this dead end and try another tack?

 

Edited by Shyheels

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It's a legitimate construction and it means that the following is moot.

Let's excise the words you impute are mine, 'poor', 'waifs', 'cold', 'exposed', 'in the glare of the footlights'.  Actually the Kardashians have never taken the image of vulnerable.  Rather they've chosen to be rich and untouchable, until one unwittingly showed us that there's no such thing.

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It means nothing of the sort.

Chose your own descriptives for vulnerable and uncomfortable then - you will come up with the same thing. It's like a recounting stack of coins that adds up to 99p - it'll add up to that no matter which way you count them, the 20p coins first or the coppers.

Using women on the red carpet as examples of vulnerable and exposed women was never going to advance your argument. One has only to point to the Kardashians and their ilk.  

A dead end if ever there was one.    

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Beginning a sentence with 'If' does not in itself make the statement which follows moot.   Whilst an element of doubt might be implied by 'if', its use is nothing more than a conventional politeness unless the context clearly shows otherwise.   'If...' = 'That being so...', or 'As...'.   For example, if a man tells his friend that he is now aged 65, the friend could reply 'If you are, you can get a pension ...' without implying that he disbelieves the stated age.

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You're quite right, Puffer, but Shyheels is undoubtedly using 'if' to introduce a note of doubt, which is 'moot'.

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Posted (edited)

"Undoubtedly"?

Huh?

How can it be undoubted when I have specifically stated otherwise?  I know what I mean. And so do you. Done now.

 

Edited by Shyheels

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6 hours ago, meganiwish said:

You're quite right, Puffer, but Shyheels is undoubtedly using 'if' to introduce a note of doubt, which is 'moot'.

Your first four words say it all, Megan.   The remainder is pure speculation as Shyheels did not imply doubt merely by using 'if' and the context of his posts (let alone his denial) makes it clear that none was intended.   QED.

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On 17/04/2017 at 5:07 AM, Shyheels said:

Hardly moot, Megan.

if they love it - and clearly they do - they are not the vulnerable, uncomfortable and put-upon women you would have us believe!

I think you need to read the sentence again, Puffer, my friend.  Take out Shyheels's parentheses and the context clearly implies moot.  The opposite, 'If they don't love it...' is implied.

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20 hours ago, meganiwish said:

I think you need to read the sentence again, Puffer, my friend.  Take out Shyheels's parentheses and the context clearly implies moot.  The opposite, 'If they don't love it...' is implied.

But, even if that is correct and the opening 'if' implies moot (in itself moot, for reasons already given), the whole point is that Shyheels's parenthetic qualification removes any doubt about the loving.   That is what he meant, and said positively.

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Yes, but his meaning it positively doesn't make it less moot. 

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